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2017 Aston Martin DB11 First Test Review: Desire On Four Wheels

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Every once in a while, a moonshot car comes along and defines the future of a brand. Think about the Porsche 959. What was a limited-run hypercar in the mid 1980s was essentially in production two decades later. The same can be said about the 2003 Bentley Continental. Sure, there were Bentleys built before and after, but that Continental was the road map for the brand’s way forward. When I say the Toyota, you think Prius. Certain cars are simply mission statements. With all that in mind, meet the DB11, the machine that will define every Aston Martin from here on out.

Should you peruse the press materials, you’ll see a line from CEO Andy Palmer that states, “We aspire to make the most beautiful cars in the world.” It must be a great work environment for the design team, huh? Anyhow, the DB11 is beautiful. Deeply, willfully, unabashedly beautiful. Admittedly, when I first saw the DB11 in print, I dismissed it as just another good-looking Aston Martin. When I saw one in the flesh at last year’s Geneva show, I thought the DB11 was sporty but not fist-bitingly sexy.
2017 Aston Martin DB11 front three quarter 02

2017 Aston Martin DB11 front three quarter 02

Counter-intuitively, auto shows are among the worst places to get a good look at a car. Tom Gale, the former head of Chrysler design, has said you have to see a car in sunlight before you can fully pass judgment. Not long ago I saw a white DB11 on the road and nearly snapped my neck trying to get a longer look. For those of you who haven’t seen the DB11 in person, I implore you to go hang out in Beverly Hills for the day. For those of you who have seen it and still don’t like it, all I can say is that sometimes people gaze upon the future and blink.

I kept finding new styling details to drool over. The most obvious are the “Curliques,” that pen on paper gesture enveloping the front wheel that makes the DB11 look like it’s rocketing forward at full speed while it’s sitting still. The Curlique first appeared on Aston Martin’s track-only super duper hyper car, the Vulcan—also done under the sharp eye of chief creative officer Marek Reichman—though the flourish looks even better here on the street-legal car.

Part of what allows such a stunning shape is the single-piece aluminum hood—the largest piece of aluminum used in the auto industry. In fact, the aluminum hood is so large that it uses a soft-close mechanism in order to minimize warping. Under that hood you’ll find one of my favorite features of the DB11: vents. These vents look remarkably similar to the vents found on the front fenders of the 991 Porsche GT3 RS. Functionally, vents like these are needed in high-performance cars because they release high-pressure air from the wheelwells, reducing lift. Aesthetically, they look lousy on the Porsche. Thankfully, Aston had the good sense to cover them.

The list of design-led engineering features—like the Curlique—on the Aston Martin DB11 is rather long, but the Aeroblade is noteworthy enough to deserve mentioning. Reichman’s team didn’t want the DB11’s shape to be interrupted by a spoiler or a wing on the back. They wanted to maintain the sloping shape of the back deck, keeping pure the rear end of the machine. Working with the engineering team, the designers discovered that passing air from vents in the C-pillars through and out the trunklid created a virtual spoiler that reduces drag. Pretty nifty, no? Should more downforce be in order, there’s a slender pop-up Gurney flap that rises in front of the Aeroblade’s holes. There’s no “BMW mode” for the Gurney flap, so you can’t pop it up while the car is parked.

Did a DB9 ever drive as good as it looked? Well, not really. You sort of gave that big old beauty a pass because, well, just look at it. As for the DB11, look, it’s not a Miata. It’s not even an Aston Martin V8 Vantage. The DB11 is, however, a big grand touring machine. And I mean big—4,194 pounds of Britishness, a number that I initially found quite shocking, especially considering that the last DB9 we weighed clocked in a relatively light 3,890 pounds. True, the DB11 is longer and wider (but shorter) than the car it replaces, but I’ve got no clue as to where the additional 22 stone come from. (That’s 306 pounds to us Yankee types.) That’s the remarkable thing, however. The DB11 is brilliant to drive. Think of it as a baby Bentley, as the latest DB is easily a half-ton lighter than a 600-horsepower Continental. Viewed through that lens, the DB11’s driving character is suddenly phenomenal. The steering is great, the road holding—even on the preposterously named Bridgestone S007 tires—is stellar, and power is exactly how it should be.
2017 Aston Martin DB11 front end in motion

2017 Aston Martin DB11 front end in motion

When international bureau chief Angus MacKenzie first drove the DB11, he said the best all-around suspension setting was Sport. For cruising, perhaps, but for beating up back roads, Sport Plus is the way to go. However, I’d suggest putting the powertrain into Sport—Sport Plus makes the engine too twitchy, a nifty achievement in lag reduction—while selecting Track for the traction control. That latter adjustment allows plenty of slippage before the nannies kick in. When the traction control is left in normal, the computer intervention is far too frequent, to the point that it actually slows down your canyon carving. In Track, the nanny’s about as good as these sorts of systems get. The DB11 is sorted on the road. The track, as you’ll see, is a different story.

Before we get to what our resident hot-shoe and 24 Hours of Daytona winner Randy Pobst thinks of the DB11, let’s talk about what our test team was able to coax out of it. Zero to 60 mph takes place in 3.8 seconds. The quarter mile is dispatched in 11.9 seconds at 124.7 mph, the sort of trap speed you’d expect from a 600-hp car. Do you want the DB11 to be quicker? I’d answer with a question: Does it need to be quicker? For whatever it’s worth, road test editor Chris Walton noted that there’s no launch control program, and it’s tricky to put all that power down without breaking loose the rear wheels. Braking happens from 60 mph in a tidy 105 feet. Grip, as mentioned, is great. The DB11 pulls 0.98 g’s. The big Aston can complete our figure-eight handling course in 23.9 seconds, and anything in the 23-second range is excellent.

Randy was able to pilot the DB11 around Big Willow’s 2.42 miles in 1:30.38. That’s quicker than the AWD Jaguar F-Type R or the Nissan GT-R 45th Anniversary, both of which took 1:30.48. Walton, however, was quick to point out that the Chevy Camaro SS 1LE, which can be had for about a fifth of the cost of a DB11, runs Big Willow in 1:28.29. True enough, but if that’s your criteria for buying a car, you probably ought to look elsewhere. (Aston Martin just launched an entirely new sub-brand devoted to track toys called AMR. Although there’s nothing official yet, my sources tell me there will be an AMR DB11 track special. Problem solved.)

For his part, Randy was certain the DB11 would put down a better time. “I started with a bit of a trot, in equestrian terms if you will. The twin-turbo V-12 builds thrust so smoothly it initially felt like less than the massive advertised 600 horsepower. The transmission was satisfyingly quick with the paddles, though it wasn’t smart enough in full auto. The brakes suffered from a long and mushy pedal with very low bite, probably due to abuse in earlier testing. I was sure I’d left a lot of time on the table in warm up because I was saving tires for the real thing. However, when I whipped this thoroughbred up to a full gallop, its luxury mission and heft made it pretty clear that the DB11 was much happier at a canter. Suddenly going out, I only gained a couple seconds, with much greater levels of roll and secondary motions.” As it sits, the DB11 is not an ideal track car.

Like that’s actually a problem. Every once in a while a car comes along and resets my internal metrics. It makes me both rethink and remember why it is I love the automobile so very much, why I devote so much critical thinking and time to mechanized objects with four wheels. The Pagani Huayra is one such car that springs to mind. The Aston Martin DB11 is, too. Color me impressed. Saddened, too, that we’ve reached the end of the review, and I forgot to mention the mind-bendingly gorgeous interior. Brogue all the leather! More reassuringly, the DB11 is the first of seven products to emerge from Aston Martin’s Second Century Plan, a scheme to keep the historically bankruptcy-prone concern afloat for its next 100 years. Here’s to the future.

Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/aston-martin/db11/2017/2017-aston-martin-db11-first-test-review/

Top 5 Porsche Concept Cars [VIDEO]

Porsche has made a lot of concept cars over the years. Some of them made it to production while others were cancelled during development. The top 5 include the 754, 989, Cayenne Cabriolet, 918 Spyder, and the Mission E all-electric car.

According to a report by Road and Track, the German luxury automaker made a recent video of their top 5 concept cars. The list and the video can be found below.

Porsche 754. The T7 754 is the 911′s ancestor. This is the concept car the 911 is based off and is sometimes also called the 695. The concept was rejected due to the rear end, but the front end is unmistakably the 911. It was originally proposed in 1959.

The 695 was a 1961 model, although it could be the very same car. It was unveiled at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor Show. A year later, it was officially released onto the roads as the iconic 911 model.

Porsche 989. The 989 was a 4-door performance touring sedan that was developed sometime between 1988 to 1991. It was never produced and development was halted and eventually canceled in January 1992.

An increase of sales of the 928 model in the eighties resulted in executives considering another large touring. They wanted a 4-door that could also serve as a more practical but equally powerful alternative to the 928. The vehicle needed to be both luxurious and comfortable but still sporty. They wanted something similar to a large saloon car from BMW or Mercedes-Benz.

The original engineer assigned to the vehicle, Ulrich Bez, left Porsche in September 1991. As a result, the vehicle lost momentum and was eventually halted completely.

Porsche Cayenne Cabriolet. The Cayenne Cabriolet was actually a secret, according to Car Mag. It was designed in 2002 and is one of the craziest concept designs by the German automaker. Now that the Range Rover Evoque Cabriolet is already available it actually does not seem as bizarre anymore.

Porsche 918 Spyder. The 918 Spyder was a mid-engine plug-in hybrid. It was first shown as a concept at the 80th Geneva Motor Show in March 2010. It was eventually released as a limited edition Hypercar with 918 units sold as a 2014 model.

The Spyder had a naturally aspirated 4.6-liter V8 engine which could develop 608 horsepower. It also had two electric motors that could deliver an addition 279 horsepower. The 918 had a combined output of 887 horsepower and had a top speed of around 210 mph.

Porsche Mission E. The Mission E is the final car in the top 5 concept car lineup. This was first shown in 2015 at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

The Mission E is the German automaker’s first fully electric car. It has 2 electric motors controlled by a Torque vectoring system and can produce over 600 horsepower. It has super-fast charging and can even be charged in around 20 minutes or less. It can go from 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds and can run over 155 mph. Currently, the Mission E is said to be under development and is set to launch in 2020.

Those were the top 5 concept cars according to Porsche. The video can be found below. Which one is your favorite? Share your thoughts and comments below.

Article source: http://www.autoworldnews.com/articles/35047/20170317/top-5-porsche-concept-cars-video.htm

Top 5 Porsche Concept Cars [VIDEO] : Auto Reviews : Auto World …

Porsche has made a lot of concept cars over the years. Some of them made it to production while others were cancelled during development. The top 5 include the 754, 989, Cayenne Cabriolet, 918 Spyder, and the Mission E all-electric car.

According to a report by Road and Track, the German luxury automaker made a recent video of their top 5 concept cars. The list and the video can be found below.

Porsche 754. The T7 754 is the 911′s ancestor. This is the concept car the 911 is based off and is sometimes also called the 695. The concept was rejected due to the rear end, but the front end is unmistakably the 911. It was originally proposed in 1959.

The 695 was a 1961 model, although it could be the very same car. It was unveiled at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor Show. A year later, it was officially released onto the roads as the iconic 911 model.

Porsche 989. The 989 was a 4-door performance touring sedan that was developed sometime between 1988 to 1991. It was never produced and development was halted and eventually canceled in January 1992.

An increase of sales of the 928 model in the eighties resulted in executives considering another large touring. They wanted a 4-door that could also serve as a more practical but equally powerful alternative to the 928. The vehicle needed to be both luxurious and comfortable but still sporty. They wanted something similar to a large saloon car from BMW or Mercedes-Benz.

The original engineer assigned to the vehicle, Ulrich Bez, left Porsche in September 1991. As a result, the vehicle lost momentum and was eventually halted completely.

Porsche Cayenne Cabriolet. The Cayenne Cabriolet was actually a secret, according to Car Mag. It was designed in 2002 and is one of the craziest concept designs by the German automaker. Now that the Range Rover Evoque Cabriolet is already available it actually does not seem as bizarre anymore.

Porsche 918 Spyder. The 918 Spyder was a mid-engine plug-in hybrid. It was first shown as a concept at the 80th Geneva Motor Show in March 2010. It was eventually released as a limited edition Hypercar with 918 units sold as a 2014 model.

The Spyder had a naturally aspirated 4.6-liter V8 engine which could develop 608 horsepower. It also had two electric motors that could deliver an addition 279 horsepower. The 918 had a combined output of 887 horsepower and had a top speed of around 210 mph.

Porsche Mission E. The Mission E is the final car in the top 5 concept car lineup. This was first shown in 2015 at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

The Mission E is the German automaker’s first fully electric car. It has 2 electric motors controlled by a Torque vectoring system and can produce over 600 horsepower. It has super-fast charging and can even be charged in around 20 minutes or less. It can go from 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds and can run over 155 mph. Currently, the Mission E is said to be under development and is set to launch in 2020.

Those were the top 5 concept cars according to Porsche. The video can be found below. Which one is your favorite? Share your thoughts and comments below.

Article source: http://www.autoworldnews.com/articles/35047/20170317/top-5-porsche-concept-cars-video.htm

Top Gear episode 2 review – It’s funny and dangerous.. what more do you want?

THE NEW Top Gear is great.

There.. I’ve said it. It’s dangerous, it’s funny.. What more do you want?

The new Top Gear is starting to prove itself.

The new Top Gear is starting to prove itself.

It’s the humour that sets this apart from Chris Evans’ failed series.

Matt Le Blanc’s heavy-lidded quips always hit home.

His droll approach feels brilliantly uncensored – like when he calls fellow presenter Chris Harris an ‘A-hole’. It’s what we’re all thinking.

Harris is in the job for a kicking.

He’s the fall guy – the Zippo Marx. Yes, he knows his stuff – but boy do we take pleasure when he cocks up. It’s pantomime villain 101, but it works.

When Harris brags, then fails to drift an Alfa Romeo Giulia through a car-shaped hole in a wall – smashing the windscreen instead – a nation cries YES.

Chris Harris has landed the role of fall guy among the new cast.

Chris Harris has landed the role of fall guy among the new cast.

As Rory Reid laughs on from the umpire’s seat, we all laugh along. Harris looks genuinely shaken. But it’s still funny.

Reid is the real star – and sadly, we haven’t seen enough of him.

He’s got natural funny bones and a passion for cars that cries through.

He’s playing the joker… A wild card that is turning this series into something special.

His scripted lines about honouring the Prius were good – a nod to Clarkson’s hatred of the car. But I can’t wait until Reid is really let loose.

So yes, the visuals are epic.



Haring out of Las Vegas in two supercars – it’d be hard not to make that look sensational.

A Lamborghini Huracán Spyder vs a Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet. Le Blanc v Harris. Yes please.

A downhill race with the engines switched off.  A game of nerves that nearly sees Le Blanc fall off a mountain. That’s real edge.

Episode two saw the cast race supercars in the snow.

Episode two saw the cast race supercars in the snow.

And yes, The Stig is back – pushing the Alfa Romeo Giulia to the max. We missed him last week.

But is it dangerous enough? Star quality? Of course we want to see film stars barely survive a lap of Dunsfold.

David Tenant puts a helluva dent in the Nissan GTR this week.

Giving the stars a car with this amount of grunt gives the show extra danger.

The new series has managed to revive the show's comedic edge.

The new series has managed to revive the show’s comedic edge.

This series was in danger of becoming a show about cars.  Just two episodes in and it’s clear this will live and thrive on the comedy between the stars.

And so far, it’s hitting the right spot.

Top Gear trailer shows Matt LeBlanc and co-stars driving supercars in the snow

Article source: https://www.thesun.co.uk/motors/3077883/top-gear-episode-2-review-its-funny-and-dangerous-what-more-do-you-want/

What the experts say about the 2017 Porsche Cayenne

Boston.com Cars is your go-to resource for coverage of local car news, events, and reviews. In the market for a car or truck? Check out our new car specials and used car specials curated by our local dealer network.

In this ongoing series, Boston.com talks with automotive authorities about why you should consider driving — or avoiding — a specific model.

2017 Porsche Cayenne

The Porsche Cayenne boasts one of the highest price tags in the category, but it’s for good reason. The SUV is uncommonly sleek, refined, and packed with raw power.

The Cayenne’s base trim runs on a 300-horsepower, 3.6-liter V6 paired to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The SUV’s family includes four additional, more powerful variants. The 3.6-liter V6 powering the S and GTS trims returns 420 and 440 horsepower, respectively. The top-of-the-line Turbo and Turbo S trims get a twin-turbocharged 4.8-liter V8 engine that makes 520 horsepower and 570 horsepower.

Inside Porsche’s largest SUV, you’ll find an abundance of leather – covering the seats and door handles and wrapping around the center console and gear selector. The Cayenne also gets the Porsche Communication Management infotainment system with a 7-inch touch screen that you can swipe and pinch. The drawback for large families is that, unlike competitors such as the BMW X5, the five-passenger Cayenne doesn’t come with an option for a third row. Adults fit comfortably in the back row, but the extra legroom comes at the expense of cargo space, which is below average.

The 2017 Porsche Cayenne has not been tested by either of the federal vehicle ratings agencies, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “IIHS doesn’t regularly test high-end sports or luxury models,” explains spokesman Russ Rader. Available safety features include adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, blind spot monitoring, a 360-degree view camera, and forward collision warning with automatic braking.

The base trim starts at $60,000. Starting prices for other trims increase up to $159,600 for the high-performance Turbo S trim.

What the experts are saying

Joyful acceleration

“The word ‘slow’ has never been used to describe a Porsche Cayenne. Neither have the words ‘uncomfortable’ or ‘imprecise’ or ‘unrefined.’ Cayennes are simply impressive from behind the wheel. Each is a blast to drive. In fact, even the Cayenne S E-Hybrid is a bona fide hoot, zipping to 60 mph in only 5.4 seconds, yet returning an estimated 47 MPGe in hybrid electric mode. The Cayenne Diesel offers copious torque and near-30 mpg on the highway, while the Porsche Cayenne GTS, with its turbocharged V6, rockets from 0-60 mph in 4.4 seconds. The 570-horsepower Turbo S hits 60 mph in about 3.5 seconds. That’s crazy quick. However, there’s much more to the Cayenne than outright speed. Cornering precision is beyond what you should rightfully expect from any SUV, and the 8-speed Tiptronic automatic transmission is tuned to perfection. And it’s all delivered with the refinement of a world-class luxury car.” – Scott Oldham, contributing editor, KBB.com

Smooth sailing

“The 2017 Porsche Cayenne is an ultra-luxury sport SUV that combines the day-to-day utility of a practical SUV with the dynamic drive that only a Porsche can offer. Considered by most to be the car that saved the brand, the Porsche Cayenne has evolved itself into a true New Englander’s dream SUV. A turn of the ignition reveals an engine sound reminiscent of the very DNA that is imbedded deep in the lightweight steel and aluminum chassis of the Cayenne. Put your foot on the rectangle brake pedal, then smoothly glide the gear shifter into the drive position and let the 8-speed Tiptronic transmission guide you to your destination. The multi-function display in front of you on the dashboard allows access to all of the car’s major functions on the go, including a second navigation map, Bluetooth, and radio.” – Mikail Moiseyev, general manager, Porsche of Burlington

An aspirational SUV

“The Porsche Cayenne debuted last decade to some controversy. After all, here was an SUV from a brand renowned for pure sports cars. It has since proven itself an invaluable asset to Porsche and is controversial no more. The Cayenne is a cash machine given the luxury market’s love for SUVs, providing the automaker with the funds necessary to continue developing and making some of the most beloved sports cars on the planet. And, it is a stonking sports machine in its own right, providing an amazing and compelling mix of neck breaking speed, road gripping handling, and SUV functionality. Today’s Cayenne continues to be one of the most aspirational SUVs with one of the best performance credentials in the business. As performance SUVs have become more common in the luxury marketplace, Cayenne remains among the most desirable.” – Ed Kim, vice president of industry analysis at marketing research and consulting firm AutoPacific

Article source: https://www.boston.com/cars/cars/2017/03/10/what-the-experts-say-about-the-2017-porsche-cayenne

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 First Look

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There’s more to the 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 than meets the eye. “We didn’t concentrate on making the car look different,” says Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT car development. “We concentrated on making it more efficient.” So though it looks familiar, the new GT3 features significant engine, suspension, and aerodynamics upgrades, all designed to make one of Porsche’s sportiest 911 variants even faster.

The new GT3 is powered by a 4.0-liter naturally aspirated flat-six that develops 494 hp at 8,250 rpm and 339 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 rpm. It’s not same 4.0-liter engine used in the current GT3 RS, however. Optimized to reduce internal friction, it features, among other things, a new crankshaft with larger main bearings and a redesigned oiling system, a new variable intake manifold that’s designed to increase low-end and midrange torque, and a redesigned valve train that does away with hydraulic lifters. Two ram air scoops on the carbon fiber engine cover funnel air directly into the intake system. The resulting high-pressure airflow at speed is said to deliver at least 10 hp more than the engine’s rated output on a static dyno.

Preuninger says the new GT3’s engine is a big step up from the 4.0 liter in the current RS and a quantum leap compared with the 3.8-liter powerplant in the previous GT3, pointing out many of the changes that have been made to improve the 911’s performance on the racetrack. “We now use this engine in the GT3 R and RSR race cars,” he says. ” It’s the same raw block—a new motorsport block, let’s put it like that—we use for all the race car engines. It’s all one family.”

Underneath the familiar sensual curves of the 991-series 911 bodywork is a revised suspension that’s lighter, with new geometry up front and helper springs all round that deliver more stiffness and precision on the track but a smoother ride on regular roads. The PASM calibration has been changed so it’s a little firmer on the track. There are new harder bushings in the front wishbones, but the damper valving has been tuned to improve rolling comfort on back roads. The ZF rear-wheel steering system pioneered on the previous-gen GT3 has been retained.

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 engine2018 Porsche 911 GT3 engine

BREATHE DEEP Twin ram air scoops on the carbon-fiber engine cover are functional and funnel air directly into a redesigned intake manifold. Positive pressure from the system can add up to 10 horsepower.

The 2018 GT3 rolls on the same 20-inch forged alloy wheels as the old car, but Preuninger says that’s only because his team couldn’t design new ones that looked better and were just as light. The rims are wrapped in new specification and new compound tires, either Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 or Dunlop Sport Maxx, 245/35 ZR20 up front and 305/30 ZR20 at the rear. Standard brakes feature 15-inch steel rotors and new calipers designed to reduce drag. Porsche’s PCCB setup, which delivers 16.5-inch carbon-ceramic rotors up front and 14-inch items at the rear, is available as an option.

To the joy of many Porsche faithful, the six-speed manual transmission used in the 911R is also available as an option. Preuninger says that though the D-I-Y GT3 is about 0.5 second slower to 60 mph than the standard PDK-equipped car, the stick shift will appeal to owners who aren’t interested in chasing the ultimate lap time. Manual transmission cars come equipped with a fixed rate limited slip differential, and PDK-equipped cars get the more sophisticated electronically controlled differential for ultimate traction.
2018 Porsche 911 GT3 cockpit

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 cockpit

Careful attention has been paid to aerodynamics. A new front fascia improves cooling and delivers better laminar flow around the front wheels. At the rear is a new wing that sits farther rearward and almost an inch higher. But what’s more interesting is the stuff you can’t see. This new GT3 is the first 911 with an aerodynamic floor, with turning vanes behind the front axle that guide air into a rear diffuser. The result, Preuninger says, is a 20-percent increase in downforce compared with the old GT3 and no increase in drag.

Despite the outcry from enthusiasts over the lack of a manual, the previous GT3 was the most successful in the 18-year history of the nameplate. Now with a manual transmission back in the mix, the new GT3 is a car that will appeal both to aficionados who enjoy deeper interaction with the art of driving, as well as hardcore track rats. “It’s the best GT3 ever,” Preuninger says. He pauses, then smiles. “Because it’s the newest one I’ve done. I always say that.”

Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/news/2018-porsche-911-gt3-first-look-review/

Porsche considering all-electric Macan SUVs and hybrid 911s

Tesla’s electric cars could soon have a rival as Porsche continues its efforts to develop electric and hybrid cars.

Porsche’s sales chief has hinted at a possible hybrid version of the celebrated 911, along with electric versions of other Porsche models.

The Volkswagen-owned company has already been working on its Mission E project for some time, which will see an electric car capable of being charged to 80% in 15 minutes go into production by 2020.

Related: Who’s to blame when robot cars get it wrong?

Now, as Reuters reports, sales chief Detlev von Platen has discussed the firm’s future beyond Mission E, suggesting we could see more electric vehicles from Porsche in the near future.

“We have other ideas beyond the Mission E,” he told Reuters at the Geneva auto show, before mentioning the compact SUV Macan model as a possible candidate for an electric overhaul.

The Mission E concept car

Von Platen also suggested hybrid versions of the iconic 911 and Boxster/Cayman sports cars, that use both petrol and electric power, could appear in the future.

VW has plans to launch more than 30 new electric vehicles by 2025, and Porsche is the second biggest contributor to VW’s overall profit, so there’s certainly scope for the firm to introduce a range of electric vehicles.

Back in 2015, Porsche showed off its 600 horsepower Mission E concept car in Frankfurt, which is capable of reaching 0-100kmph (62mph) in 3.5 seconds.

That’s faster than the 911 (4.2 seconds), and is an impressive stat considerig the car also has a range of 500km on a single charge (Tesla’s Model S sedan can go 528km on a single charge).

For now, there’s nothing in the way of concrete details surrounding a hybrid Porsche 911, or electric Macan, but Porsche certainly looks as though it could become a big Tesla rival in the coming decade, so stay tuned for more.

WATCH: Tesla Model S Review – The Ultimate Rental Car?

Let us know what you think of Porsche’s plans in the comments.

Article source: http://www.trustedreviews.com/news/porsche-considering-all-electric-macan-suvs-and-hybrid-911s

Jaguar F-Pace S vs. Mercedes-AMG GLC43 vs. Porsche Macan GTS Comparison

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I remember the day I discovered people had weekend cars. My childhood friend Greg Dorris casually let it slip that his dad had a weekend car stashed north of the city in New Paltz, New York. It was hard enough parking one car in New York City. Why bother with two?

A few weeks later we piled into their family Honda Odyssey to unfurl the weekend car. I was skeptical until I saw the British Racing Green Triumph TR6, replete with proud Union Jack flags on its hindquarters, sitting in a nondescript barn.

Suddenly, I got it.

Back in the day (you know, the ’90s), family-oriented enthusiasts didn’t have choices when it came to a car adept at hauling around the family, dealing with winter’s fury, and blasting along a country back road once the snow cleared.

We’ve come a long way.
Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front end in motion

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front end in motion

Sport-utility vehicles have evolved dramatically from bulky, clunky body-on-frame beasts to serene car-based commuters with hints of luxury. But the sport side of the equation—the creation of a tall, go-anywhere, four-door sports wagon—has been notably absent.

There must be some compromises: It has to be big enough for five folks and their luggage. And it’s going to have all-wheel drive because, according to the Department of Transportation, 70 percent of the country’s population lives where at least 5 inches of snow fall per year. We Americans like to be prepared.

Thankfully, Jaguar, Mercedes, and Porsche now have three new SUVs that fit this steep bill, all for the price of a loaded Chevy Suburban—so long as you’re willing to sacrifice that rarely used third row.

The Porsche Macan GTS is designed to bridge the performance gap between the lower-spec Macan S and higher Macan Turbo. The Macan GTS starts off with the S’ 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6, which gets revised ECU tuning to give it a healthy 360 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque. The V-6 is paired with Porsche’s PDK seven-speed twin-clutch automatic with power being sent to an all-wheel-drive system equipped with optional brake-based torque vectoring. The GTS also gets the Turbo’s electronic dampers mated to a standard air suspension with a lowered ride height. All this starts at $68,250, or $89,070(!) as tested for our heavily loaded example.

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front three quarter turn

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front three quarter turn

Jaguar’s new F-Pace S, meanwhile, is the brand’s first SUV. Built on the same platform as the XF sedan, the F-Pace is the most powerful SUV here; its 3.0-liter supercharged V-6 churns out 380 hp and 332 lb-ft of torque. The V-6 sends power through an eight-speed automatic to a rear-biased all-wheel-drive system with electronic torque vectoring. The big Jag starts at $58,695, with our loaded example driving off the lot for $72,018.

The Mercedes-AMG GLC43 swaps out the GLC300’s four-cylinder engine in favor of a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 making 362 hp and the most torque of the trio at 384 lb-ft. Its AMG-tuned V-6 gets paired with a nine-speed automatic, and the AMG air suspension gives the GLC43 a sportier ride versus non-AMG GLCs. Our lightly optioned GLC43 is the value play of the group; it tested at $63,505 but starts at $55,825.

Picking the best sporty all-weather family sportster from this trio wouldn’t be easy in sunny Los Angeles. Instead, we decided to order a set of winter tires for each, loaded the tires into the cargo hatches of our trio to simulate a full complement of passengers, and pointed our noses northeast toward snowy Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 1,000 miles away.


My Way or the Highway

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS rear three quarter in motion

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS rear three quarter in motion

It’s a long way to Colorado from California, but the endless miles of highway allowed prime turf to determine road-trip capability and comfort.

The Porsche Macan GTS isn’t the smallest, but it feels like it. The cabin is cramped and gets uncomfortable after an hour or so behind the wheel. The seats give up too much comfort in exchange for sporty support. Dynamically, the Macan delivers the thrill of acceleration, sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. That’s the quickest run here—and on standard all-season tires to boot. It ties the Mercedes (shod with summer tires) with a 13.4-second quarter-mile run, but at a slower 99.1-mph trap speed. The uprated front brakes from the Macan Turbo help the GTS nail the 60–0 stop in 112 feet, and it lays down brand-appropriate numbers in figure-eight testing with its 25.0-second time at 0.75 g average.

The Mercedes-AMG GLC43 is happier cruising the highways than its German compatriot. Its air suspension rides softly in Comfort mode, and the engine thrums quietly with the transmission in ninth gear. The cabin is a nice place to be, too, with its comfortable seats and an uncluttered design. As soft as the Mercedes feels, it wakes up when you dip into the throttle. The engine pulls strongly, and the squat of the rear suspension under hard acceleration reinforces its status asan autobahn rocket. Accelerating from 0 to 60 mph takes 4.7 seconds, and it also hits the quarter mile in 13.4 seconds, but at 104.3 mph. Thanks to its tire-grip advantage, the Mercedes manages a test-best 60-mph stopping distance of 109 feet and the second-quickest figure-eight of 25.2 seconds at 0.75 g.

The F-Pace S manages the difficult task of remaining engaging while cruising the interstate. With a high driving position and its extra length versus the other two SUVs, the Jaguar’s cabin feels open and roomy. Its interior quality doesn’t match that of the Mercedes, but it’s a nice place to spend some time. The Jag’s supercharged V-6 quiets down nicely on the freeway, but it wakes up and sounds epic when you light the wick. The F-Pace will do 0–60 mph in 5.2 seconds and the quarter mile in 13.8 seconds at 100.6 mph. It’s the slowest of the three, but it doesn’t feel it. The F-Pace’s best 60–0-mph stop was 115 feet, and its figure-eight performance was a 26.1-second lap averaging 0.69 g.


Rocky Mountain High

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front end in motion

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front end in motion

After our daylong slog on the highway, we were desperate for some entertainment. As we crossed into Colorado, we pointed our SUVs up the mountain roads of the Continental Divide.

Out of its element on the highway, the Macan shines blitzing up a back road. “It’s very capable and confident,” associate editor Scott Evans said. The Macan’s steering is quick and accurate, even if lacking in feel, and the $1,490 optional Porsche Torque Vectoring + system works hard to get the Macan’s butt turned quickly and pointed in the right direction. Although the Macan is great on a back road, senior features editor Jason Cammisa said its PDK transmission shifts are not as quick as in other Porsches. “Shifts are either brutally harsh in Sport Plus, or it interrupts power, which defeats the purpose of dual-clutch transmissions,” he said. The Macan’s V-6 could also use a bit of refinement—the two turbos are slow to spool below 2,000 rpm, and the engine feels as if it’s running out of steam as it nears redline.

The F-Pace S manages to carry over the fun factor it had on the highway into the windy roads. With the Jag’s drive mode selector in Dynamic, the F-Pace drives like a tall station wagon. Its steering is quick and communicative, and the V-6 responds promptly to throttle inputs, never leaving the driver wanting for more power. Despite the Jaguar being on steel springs compared to the air-sprung Mercedes and Porsche, the F-Pace’s ride and body roll were well controlled; the suspension damping kept the frostbitten road from upsetting the crossover’s balance. “It feels tight and responsive in a curve, always ready to pounce on the next one,” Evans said. “Without a doubt it’s the most fun and emotionally rewarding to drive.”

In Sport Plus mode, the Mercedes proved pretty adept at navigating a corner. Its nine-speed automatic helps keep the revs high and the engine on the boil. Steering is linear and responsive, rivaling the Jaguar for the best handling of the trio. Despite the AMG’s sporty settings, the GLC43 is more softly sprung than the other two crossovers. Sure, the air suspension firms up, but there’s more body roll in the Mercedes, sapping a bit of driver confidence and speed in corners compared to the Macan and F-Pace.


Winter Warriors

Once in Steamboat Springs, we called our buddies at the Bridgestone Winter Driving School to borrow one of their tracks.

Bridgestone’s research shows 28 percent of drivers outfit their vehicles with winter tires—the rest instead opting to run all-season tires year-round. So to reflect how Americans actually drive, we’d first test each vehicle’s all-wheel-drive system on stock tires and then swap a set of manufacturer-provided winter tires to see how things changed.

That posed a particular quandary for the Mercedes-AMG. Although the Merc comes with standard all-season tires, our test vehicle came outfitted with Michelin Latitude Sport 3 summer tires. They’re designed with soft rubber and shallow tread depths for maximizing performance in warmer conditions. They also typically begin to lose their effectiveness as temperatures approach 45 degrees. At below-freezing temps and on snow or ice, they’re like attempting to ice skate on rollerblades.

The Michelin summer tires got us to Colorado despite freezing temps, but on snow they quickly ran out of capability. The Benz’s all-wheel-drive system, permanently set in a 31/69 front/rear torque split, does an admirable job of getting the AMG GLC43 accelerating ever so gently, but the second you get too eager with the throttle, steering wheel, or brakes, all bets are off.

After a few laughs sliding around helplessly, we swapped for a set of Michelin Latitude Alpin winter tires, which proved to be plenty capable. Although it accelerates smoothly from a snowy standstill, you have to be careful through corners because the Benz’s fixed torque split induces understeer into turns more often than not. Attempting to get the GLC43 to turn quicker by inducing oversteer with the throttle results in the traction and stability control systems desperately grabbing at the brakes to regain control. “The stability control is clearly tuned for the occasional slippery surface, not full-time winter driving,” Evans said. If you turn off the nannies and put the GLC into one of its sport modes, the AMG is capable of some beautiful, fluffy drifts through snowy corners.

Riding on a set of Michelin Latitude Tour HP all-season tires, the Porsche Macan GTS was a solid performer in the snow. Although there isn’t a dedicated winter weather mode in the Macan, either, Off-Road mode proved to be a fine substitute in trickier conditions. That said, the Macan’s normal drive mode does a good job of sending power to the wheel with the most traction. “The computer manages the front/rear torque split smartly,” Evans said. “Stability control gives you more throttle as you unwind the wheel rather than just clamping down on everything until every wheel stops sliding.”

Once equipped with the same winter tires as the Mercedes, the Macan GTS is nearly unstoppable in the snow. The Porsche’s all-wheel-drive system and its torque vectoring help ensure that the Macan had plenty of grip. With its electronic nannies quieted, the Macan evokes the 911 rally cars of yesteryear. “It’s beautifully balanced in the snow,” Cammisa said. “It’s neutral under gentle trail braking, but the engine’s output goes 50/50 front/rear immediately on power, making drifts tough to initiate with the right pedal.” Evans agreed, adding that it takes a good goosing of the throttle to get it sideways.

The F-Pace is a surprising rock star on its stock all-season tires. Riding on Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric AT tires and left in its default drive setting, the Jaguar was sure-footed even under hard acceleration and braking, thanks to its Adaptive Surface Response system. It’s obvious Jag engineers spent lots of time across the hall at Land Rover. With the F-Pace’s drive select system in Rain/Ice/Snow mode, the F-Pace gets even better, handily accelerating up icy hills even with a tire handicap. “It’s the best car here for the everyday driver in inclement weather,” Evans said.

With a set of Yokohama WDrive winter tires—admittedly an outdated tire design, neither asymmetric nor directional—the Jaguar is a monster. It practically accelerates and turns as if it were on pavement. Things get even better once you turn off the nannies. Put the transmission in manual to keep the V-6 singing, and the F-Pace becomes an absolute drift machine. Its chassis is wonderfully balanced with quick steering, and its rear-biased all-wheel-drive system does an exceptional job of keeping the Jaguar pointed where the driver wants it.


The Podium

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front three quarter 02

Jaguar F Pace S AWD Mercedes AMG GLC43 4Matic Porsche Macan GTS front three quarter 02

The Porsche Macan GTS was a solid performer in our back-road and winter-weather testing, but its road-trip manners and wonky transmission tuning left us cold, resulting in a third-place finish. There’s also the issue of its sticker price; the Macan is not anywhere near $20,000 better than the others.

With a lower sticker price and a more luxurious interior, the Mercedes is a better value than the Jaguar. It’s also supremely comfortable on the highway and can hold its own when you drop the hammer. However, its fixed all-wheel-drive torque split simply made it less capable and less fun than the other two in the snow, relegating the GLC43 to second place.

The Jaguar F-Pace expertly manages competing demands of being a family mover, highway cruiser, and back-road bomber. Saddle that with its exceptional snow performance and spacious cabin, and the Jaguar just edges out the Mercedes for the win. Yes, this means our SUV of the Year has been beaten on a wintry playing field. But in this case, the top-trim Jag’s winter-weather edge and more engaging drive experience is enough to give F-Pace top billing over the comparable Mercedes.

2017 Jaguar F-Pace S AWD
2017 Mercedes-AMG GLC43 4Matic
2017 Porsche Macan GTS
POWERTRAIN/CHASSIS
DRIVETRAIN LAYOUT
Front-engine, AWD
Front-engine, AWD
Front-engine, AWD
ENGINE TYPE
Supercharged 90-deg V-6, alum block/heads
Twin-turbo 60-deg V-6, alum block/heads
Twin-turbo 90-deg V-6, alum block/heads
VALVETRAIN
DOHC, 4 valves/cyl
DOHC, 4 valves/cyl
DOHC, 4 valves/cyl
DISPLACEMENT
182.7 cu in/2,995 cc
182.8 cu in/2,996 cc
182.9 cu in/2,997 cc
COMPRESSION RATIO
10.5:1
10.7:1
9.8:1
POWER (SAE NET)
380 hp @ 6,500 rpm
362 hp @ 5,500 rpm
360 hp @ 6,000 rpm
TORQUE (SAE NET)
332 lb-ft @ 4,500 rpm
384 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm
369 lb-ft @ 1,650 rpm
REDLINE
6,500 rpm
6,300 rpm
6,800 rpm
WEIGHT TO POWER
11.7 lb/hp
11.8 lb/hp
12.5 lb/hp
TRANSMISSION
8-speed automatic
9-speed automatic
7-speed twin-clutch auto.
AXLE/FINAL-DRIVE RATIO
3.73:1/2.49:1
3.69:1/2.21:1
3.88:1/2.01:1
SUSPENSION, FRONT; REAR
Control arms, coil springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar; multilink, coil springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar
Multilink, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar; multilink, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar
Control arms, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar; multilink, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar
STEERING RATIO
15.1:1
14.5:1
14.3:1
TURNS LOCK-TO-LOCK
2.6
2.3
2.6
BRAKES, F; R
13.8-in vented disc; 12.8-in vented disc, drum, ABS
14.2-in vented, drilled disc; 12.6-in vented disc, ABS
14.2-in vented disc; 13.0-in vented disc, ABS
WHEELS
8.5 x 20-in cast aluminum
8.5 x 20-in; 9.5 x 20-in, cast aluminum
9.0 x 20-in; 10.0 x 20-in forged aluminum
TIRES
255/50R20 109Y (M+S) Goodyear Eagle F1 AT
255/45R20 105Y; 285/40R20 108Y Michelin Latitude Sport 3 MO
265/45R20 104V (M+S); 295/40R20 106V (M+S) .Michelin Latitude Tour HP NO
DIMENSIONS
WHEELBASE
113.1 in
113.1 in
110.5 in
TRACK, F/R
64.6/65.1 in
64.5/65.2 in
65.0/64.3 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT
186.3 x 76.2 x 65.0 in
183.5 x 76.0 x 64.1 in
184.7 x 76.1 x 63.0 in
GROUND CLEARANCE
8.4 in
6.7 in (max load)
6.2-9.1 in
APPRCH/DEPART ANGLE
25.5/25.7 deg
25.0/24.0 deg
22.2-25.5/19.5-24.2 deg
TURNING CIRCLE
38.9 ft
39.7 ft
39.2 ft
CURB WEIGHT
4,442 lb
4,256 lb
4,506 lb
WEIGHT DIST, F/R
51/49%
54/46%
56/44%
TOWING CAPACITY
5,290 lb
3,500 lb
4,409 lb
SEATING CAPACITY
5
5
5
HEADROOM, F/R
37.8/37.5 in
37.8/38.5 in
38.6/38.7 in
LEGROOM, F/R
40.3/37.2 in
40.8/37.3 in
40.9/35.6 in
SHOULDER ROOM, F/R
57.7/55.8 in
57.3/56.5 in
56.9/54.9 in
CARGO VOL BEH F/R
63.5/33.5 cu ft
56.5/19.4 cu ft
53.0/17.7 cu ft
TEST DATA
ACCELERATION TO MPH
0-30
1.9 sec
1.8 sec
1.4 sec
0-40
2.8
2.6
2.2
0-50
3.9
3.6
3.2
0-60
5.2
4.7
4.5
0-70
6.7
6.2
6.1
0-80
8.6
7.9
8.1
0-90
10.7
9.9
10.6
0-100
13.6
12.3
13.7
0-100-0
18.1
16.5
18.1
PASSING, 45-65 MPH
2.6
2.4
2.5
QUARTER MILE
13.8 sec @ 100.6 mph
13.4 sec @ 104.3 mph
13.4 sec @ 99.1 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH
115 ft
109 ft
112 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION
0.85 g (avg)
0.91 g (avg)
0.90 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT
26.1 sec @ 0.69 g (avg)
25.2 sec @ 0.75 g (avg)
25.0 sec @ 0.75 g (avg)
TOP-GEAR REVS @ 60 MPH
1,700 rpm
1,800 rpm
1,800 rpm
CONSUMER INFO
BASE PRICE
$58,695
$55,825
$68,250
PRICE AS TESTED
$72,018
$63,505
$89,070
STABILITY/TRACTION CONTROL
Yes/Yes
Yes/Yes
Yes/Yes
AIRBAGS
6: Dual front, front side, f/r head
7: Dual front, f/r side, f/r curtain, driver knee
8: Dual front, f/r side, f/r curtain, front knee
BASIC WARRANTY
5 yrs/60,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
5 yrs/60,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
5 yrs/60,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
4 yrs/50,000 miles
FUEL CAPACITY
16.6 gal
17.4 gal
19.8 gal
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB ECON
18/23/20 mpg
18/24/20 mpg
17/23/19 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY
187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
187/140 kW-hrs/100 miles
198/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB
0.97 lb/mile
0.96 lb/mile
1.01 lb/mile
RECOMMENDED FUEL
Unleaded premium
Unleaded premium
Unleaded premium

Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/jaguar/f-pace/2017/jaguar-f-pace-s-mercedes-amg-glc43-porsche-macan-gts-comparison/

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo first drive review

Porsche is, among many things, one of the leaders in the automobile industry when it comes to sheer engineering. Their cars do things that defy the logic of what should be possible. Case in point, the previous Panamera, a giant of a luxury saloon that was convinced it was a sportscar. The way that car went around corners was shocking, 1.9 tonnes of metal has no business changing direction that rapidly! But there was a problem – the Panamera was a striking car but that humpback rear wasn’t easy on the eyes. It certainly wasn’t what you’d call a pretty machine. Thankfully, that’s changed with the all-new model.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (6)

Design, style and features

When Porsche says all-new, they mean it. Every single thing is changed, save for the iconic company logo. But more importantly, Porsche has achieved with the new Panamera what the old one lacked – it finally looks like a four-door 911! The roofline from the top of the A-pillar descends in a continuous and graceful arc all the way till the new 911-like tail lamps. The front wheel has been repositioned further forward, improving the stance and the side is characterised by two clean lines that emerge from the vent behind the front wheel. Viewed head-on, the Panamera looks even wider thanks to a long and wide intake in the bumper and new accent lines in the hood. An actual 6mm increase in width further enhances the effect.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (5)

The side profile now looks quite a bit like a four-door 911

 

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (4)

The big, full-LED headlamps feature Porsche’s trademark four LED spots and have a matrix function similar to Audi’s headlamps. Each headlamp uses 84 individual LEDs which allow an intelligent high beam system that can cut individual LEDs around on-coming traffic. Porsche says this is the new lighting benchmark. As with the new 718 Boxster and Cayman, the rear gets 3D tail lamps connected by a thin reflective strip that increases the sense of width. And of course, there’s Turbo’s biggest party trick – a recessed, three-piece rear wing that folds out when deployed so as to offer more surface area.

There’s a world of difference on the inside. What was once a huge collection of buttons now sees a clean black touch-sensitive glass panel as the centre console. There are very few physical buttons; the upside being that there aren’t any ugly plastic blanks to be seen if you aren’t keen on blowing the serious cash that Porsche’s optional extras demand. It takes some getting used to but the touch system works. Helping you get some feedback is a physical sensation of a depression when you press it, a similar sensation to the iPhone’s home screen button. It’s a nice way to know if the button has registered your input but takes a bit more effort than I’d have liked.

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (3)

The Panamera gets a high-tech new interior where touch panels replace most of the physical buttons

 

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (2)

Rear passengers are separated by an extension of the front centre console

Above the touch panel is a long and beautiful high-resolution touchscreen display that resides in the sleek leather-wrapped dashboard. This screen occupies the traditional space of the central air vents, so Porsche has relocated them and split them into two sections. The first sits atop the dashboard and is controlled by thumb-operated slide adjusters. The second set of vents are positioned at the top of black touch panel, just below the infotainment screen. These are more interesting because they don’t offer manual adjustment. Instead, you have to choose the Climate menu in the infotainment system, then choose ‘vents’, which gives you access to a digital slide controller for the central vent. Using your finger, slide left-right or up-down for corresponding movements in the air vents. Both the driver and passenger get split control sections for their respective vents. It’s futuristic but far more tedious and time-consuming than standard physical controls.

The central glass panel flows continuously into a space for cupholders and a stowage bin before concluding in another console for the rear passengers. This console houses a high-resolution screen above another pair of digitally controlled vents and a similar glossy black touch panel. Stepping into the rear reminds that this isn’t just a sportscar, it’s also a high-end luxury saloon. The two seats offer generous kneeroom but I was seriously impressed with how much headroom there was despite the sporty new roofline. The seats are very comfy, the squabs extend forward and the backrests recline. Rear space and comfort is now very generous, and I imagine it will be truly opulent on the long-wheelbase Panamera Turbo Executive that has an additional 150mm between the front and rear axles.

Engines and performance

2017 Porsche Panamera Turbo (1)

New 550PS twin-turbo V8 is a bomb, sounds great too!

Porsche has a comprehensive range of engines in the Panamera line-up but India gets the mighty Turbo first, so that’s what we’ll focus on. A brand new, twin-turbo, 4.0-litre, V8 petrol, this engine hammers out 550PS and 770Nm that peaks from 1,950rpm to 4,500rpm. Claimed performance is outrageous. 0-100kmph takes 3.8s which drops to 3.6s if the car is equipped with the optional Sport Chrono package. Let that sink in, that’s a 2-tonne car accelerating harder than some supercars can manage… Top speed is just over 300kmph and in-gear performance is ferocious.

There’s a huge amount of tech that makes this motor tick. It features a new, hot-in-vee turbo layout where the two turbos are nestled within the two cylinder banks with the exhaust ports facing inward. The layout brings many benefits including better control over the turbos, faster responses and more compact packaging. Then, there’s the new cylinder deactivation tech that cuts off the second, third, fifth and eight cylinder by a sliding cam system that deactivates the valve gear. When the motor is between 950-3,500rpm and less than 250Nm is required, the Panamera turns into a 4-cylinder engine with a 30 per cent jump in efficiency. There’s also a new 8-speed PDK double-clutch gearbox that offers improved smoothness and a claim of even faster shift times than the already incredible 7-speed PDK.

Ride and handling

A short slalom course highlighted the Panamera’s incredible agility

A short slalom course highlighted the Panamera’s incredible agility

Unfortunately, our drive experience of the Panamera was restricted to a rather pointless drone down Dubai’s arrow-straight highways with a maximum speed of 120kmph. For now, I can authoritatively tell you that the Panamera cruises very well at 120kmph on smooth roads. Driving the car in India will reveal far more. The Panamera’s trump card, however, is its dual offering of luxury feel and sportscar performance. Just how fast is this thing? Here’s some perspective – the new Panamera Turbo laps the Nurburgring in 7:38s which is 2s quicker than the last-generation 911 GT3. That’s a 450PS, lightweight track-special version of the 911 that weighed about 600 kilo less. I know unbelievable, right?

In an attempt to give us a taste of this phenomenal handling potential, Porsche took us to the parking lot of a rugby stadium where they set up a short slalom course. Again, not much could be gleaned from this 30-second blast through some cones except that the Panamera has freakish agility, no doubt aided by the optional rear-wheel steering system. From behind the wheel, the responses feel physically impossible for a car this large. Same goes for watching other journalists blast around the course – it just seems wrong watching such a large car change direction so hard, fast and flat. My mind is blown; Porsche really have engineered something incredible here and I can’t wait to experience it on a proper winding road.

Conclusion

At a starting price of about Rs 1.93cr for the Panamera Turbo and Rs 2.05cr for the long-wheelbase Turbo Executive, the Panamera offers a mind-bending mix of supreme luxury and incredible sportscar performance. No other car has taken the luxury-super saloon game this far ahead. How it fares in India remains to be seen but there’s no doubt that this car is a stupendously impressive machine.

Article source: http://overdrive.in/reviews/2017-porsche-panamera-turbo-first-drive-review/

2017 Porsche Macan GTS First Test Review

No Obligation, Fast Simple Free New Car Quote

Credit where credit is due: Porsche does well at making the most of any given model. Take the 911, for instance—one car, six variants. The Cayenne, too, is one model with four variants. The incredible thing about the bandwidth of Porsche’s lineup is that even with a half-dozen variants in a given model, each has its own distinctive feel and more important its own performance realm. In no model is that more true than the 2017 Porsche Macan GTS.

Like all of Porsche’s GTS variants, the Macan GTS is designed to not only split the difference between the Macan S and Macan Turbo but to also provide the purest driving experience of the lineup. In fact, Porsche even told me on the Macan GTS’ launch that although the GTS is a new model this year, it was actually the first variant developed—the rest of the Macan lineup are either dialed up or down to fit. It’s because of its place in the Macan lineup that the Macan GTS’ spec chart reads like a hodgepodge of parts from the Macan S and Macan Turbo. From the Macan S, the 2017 Macan GTS gets its 3.0-liter twin-turbo V-6 retuned to behave more like a naturally aspirated engine. It makes 360 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque, which is up 20 hp and 30 lb-ft compared to the lesser Macan. From the Macan Turbo, the 2017 Macan GTS gets its 14.1-inch six-piston front brakes (the S’ 12.9-inch calipers are standard in back) and Porsche Active Suspension Management, or PASM, which uses electronically controlled dampers.
2017 Porsche Macan GTS front end drift

2017 Porsche Macan GTS front end drift

The Macan GTS shares its PDK seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission and rear-biased all-wheel-drive system with other Macans, but that’s not to say the Macan GTS doesn’t get some unique hardware of its own—it also gets a standard air suspension (optional on other Macan models) that rides nearly a 0.5 inch lower than other models in the lineup.

At the track, the Macan GTS carefully straddles the line of performance between the Macan S and Macan Turbo. I suppose I should say Macans because we tested two similarly equipped versions of the Macan GTS—one on the standard Michelin Latitude Tour HP all-season tires and another on a set of Michelin Latitude Sport 3 summer tires, a no-cost option. Although the majority of Macan GTS buyers opt for the all-season tires, we were curious to see if the optional summer tires would improve its performance beyond that of a Macan Turbo.

Turns out that no matter the tire option, the Macan GTS neatly splits the difference between S and Turbo. Using launch control, which is enabled by shelling out an extra $1,290 for the Sport Chrono package, our all-season-equipped Macan GTS accelerated from 0 to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds and went through the quarter mile in 13.4 seconds at 99.1 mph. That’s just ahead of it is the summer-tired GTS, which hits 60 mph from a standstill in 4.4 seconds and finishes the quarter mile in 13.2 seconds at 102.4 mph. For comparison’s sake, the last Macan S we tested hit 60 mph in 4.9 seconds and did the quarter mile in 13.5 seconds at 102.1 mph, and the last Macan Turbo we tested did 0 to 60 mph in 4.2 seconds and finished the quarter mile in 12.9 seconds at 106.2 mph.

That trend continues in our other instrumented tests. In 60–0-mph braking, for instance, the summer-tired Macan GTS stops in 104 feet, the all-season-tired GTS in 112 feet (side note: if that doesn’t illustrate the major advantage of summer tires over all-seasons, I don’t know what will), the Macan S in 119 feet, and the Macan Turbo with its bigger rear brakes in 102 feet. Just about the only performance category where the Macan GTS has an advantage over its more powerful Macan Turbo brother is on the figure eight. With both our testers equipped with Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus, a brake-based torque vectoring system, our summer-tire-equipped example lapped the figure eight in 24.9 seconds at 0.76 g average compared to the Turbo’s 25.0-second at 0.78 g performance. That 0.5-inch lower suspension would really seem to make a difference. The Macan GTS on all-seasons matched the Turbo’s 25.0-second time around the figure eight at 0.75 g.

Out on the road, the 2017 Macan GTS drives like a Porsche should—quick and capable. Through twisting and turning back roads and in its Sport or Sport Plus settings, the Macan’s PDK helps mitigate lag by keeping the twin-turbo V-6 revving above 2,000 rpm and by shifting quickly on the straights. The Macan’s steering feedback is generally good, though there’s little in the way of actual feel of the road—likely due to its origins in a more mild-mannered Audi Q5. The PTV+ system is expensive at $1,490, but it makes itself known around tight switchbacks as it brakes the inside rear tire and helps the Porsche get its butt planted and nose turned around to face the next set of corners. In more pedestrian drive situations such as commuting, the Macan GTS quiets down nicely. Throttle and braking response is good in stop-and-go traffic, as is the ride quality—I’d only wish for more comfortable seats because the stock sport seats get uncomfortable after about an hour behind the wheel.
2017 Porsche Macan GTS front end drift 02

2017 Porsche Macan GTS front end drift 02

Although the GTS isn’t the quickest of Macans, it certainly feels the sportiest. It’s pricing is also a bit easier to swallow than the $77,050 Macan Turbo, which you’d need to fit with nearly $6,000 in performance options to match the Macan GTS’ stock handling prowess at $68,250. Our Macan GTS tester with summer tires was relatively light on options, going for $77,255, and our all-season-equipped tester was loaded at $89,070. Although it’s the bargain of the Porsche Macan lineup, the Macan GTS doesn’t exist in a vacuum. With the likes of the Jaguar F-Pace and Mercedes-AMG GLC43 breathing down its neck, Porsche ought to start worrying more about the competition and less about splitting the difference in its model lineup.

Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/porsche/macan/2017/2017-porsche-macan-gts-first-test/