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$2.8 Big Data in the Automotive Industry Market 2017-2030 – Latest Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies & Forecasts

Dublin, May 26, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Research and Markets has announced the addition of SNS Research’s new report “Big Data in the Automotive Industry: 2017 – 2030 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies Forecasts” to their offering.

The Big Data in the Automotive Industry: 2017 – 2030 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies Forecasts report presents an in-depth assessment of Big Data in the automotive industry including key market drivers, challenges, investment potential, application areas, use cases, future roadmap, value chain, case studies, vendor profiles and strategies.

The report also presents market size forecasts for Big Data hardware, software and professional services investments from 2017 through to 2030. The forecasts are segmented for 8 horizontal submarkets, 4 application areas, 18 use cases, 6 regions and 35 countries.

Big Data originally emerged as a term to describe datasets whose size is beyond the ability of traditional databases to capture, store, manage and analyze. However, the scope of the term has significantly expanded over the years. Big Data not only refers to the data itself but also a set of technologies that capture, store, manage and analyze large and variable collections of data, to solve complex problems.

Amid the proliferation of real-time and historical data from sources such as connected devices, web, social media, sensors, log files and transactional applications, Big Data is rapidly gaining traction from a diverse range of vertical sectors. The automotive industry is no exception to this trend, where Big Data has found a host of applications ranging from product design and manufacturing to predictive vehicle maintenance and autonomous driving.

The author estimates that Big Data investments in the automotive industry will account for over $2.8 Billion in 2017 alone. Led by a plethora of business opportunities for automotive OEMs, tier-1 suppliers, insurers, dealerships and other stakeholders, these investments are further expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 12% over the next three years.

The report comes with an associated Excel datasheet suite covering quantitative data from all numeric forecasts presented in the report.

Key Questions Answered

- How big is the Big Data opportunity in the automotive industry?
- How is the market evolving by segment and region?
- What will the market size be in 2020 and at what rate will it grow?
- What trends, challenges and barriers are influencing its growth?
- Who are the key Big Data software, hardware and services vendors and what are their strategies?
- How much are automotive OEMs and other stakeholders investing in Big Data?
- What opportunities exist for Big Data analytics in the automotive industry?
- Which countries, application areas and use cases will see the highest percentage of Big Data investments in the automotive industry?

Key Findings

- In 2017, Big Data vendors will pocket over $2.8 Billion from hardware, software and professional services revenues in the automotive industry. These investments are further expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 12% over the next three years, eventually accounting for over $4 Billion by the end of 2020.
- In a bid to improve customer retention, automotive OEMs are heavily relying on Big Data and analytics to integrate an array of data-driven aftermarket services such as predictive vehicle maintenance, real-time mapping and personalized concierge services.
- In recent years, several prominent partnerships and MA deals have taken place that highlight the growing importance of Big Data in the automotive industry. For example, tier-1 supplier Delphi recently led an investment round to raise over $25 Million for Otonomo, a startup that has developed a data exchange and marketplace platform for vehicle-generated data.
- Addressing privacy concerns is necessary in order to monetize the swaths of Big Data that will be generated by a growing installed base of connected vehicles and other segments of the automotive industry.

Topics Covered

The report covers the following topics:

- Big Data ecosystem
- Market drivers and barriers
- Enabling technologies, standardization and regulatory initiatives
- Big Data analytics and implementation models
- Business case, key applications and use cases in the automotive industry
- 30 case studies of Big Data investments by automotive OEMs and other stakeholders
- Future roadmap and value chain
- Company profiles and strategies of over 240 Big Data vendors
- Strategic recommendations for Big Data vendors, automotive OEMs and other stakeholders
- Market analysis and forecasts from 2017 till 2030

Forecast Segmentation

Market forecasts are provided for each of the following submarkets and their subcategories:

Hardware, Software Professional Services

- Hardware
- Software
- Professional Services

Horizontal Submarkets

- Storage Compute Infrastructure
- Networking Infrastructure
- Hadoop Infrastructure Software
- SQL
- NoSQL
- Analytic Platforms Applications
- Cloud Platforms
- Professional Services

Application Areas

- Product Development, Manufacturing Supply Chain
- After-Sales, Warranty Dealer Management
- Connected Vehicles Intelligent Transportation
- Marketing, Sales Other Applications

Use Cases

- Supply Chain Management
- Manufacturing
- Product Design Planning
- Predictive Maintenance Real-Time Diagnostics
- Recall Warranty Management
- Parts Inventory Pricing Optimization
- Dealer Management Customer Support Services
- UBI (Usage-Based Insurance)
- Autonomous Semi-Autonomous Driving
- Intelligent Transportation
- Fleet Management
- Driver Safety Vehicle Cyber Security
- In-Vehicle Experience, Navigation Infotainment
- Ride Sourcing, Sharing Rentals
- Marketing Sales
- Customer Retention
- Third Party Monetization
- Other Use Cases

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ddq2tq/big_data_in_the

CONTACT: Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com
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Related Topics: Big Data

Article source: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2017/05/26/998608/0/en/2-8-Big-Data-in-the-Automotive-Industry-Market-2017-2030-Latest-Opportunities-Challenges-Strategies-Forecasts.html

Automotive Industry Relies on Blockchain Platforms to Enhance …

To learn more about Frost Sullivan’s research or to sign-up for our Growth Strategy Dialogue, a complimentary one-hour interactive session, with Frost Sullivan thought leaders please visit: https://goo.gl/OtvaKq 

“OEMs are only gradually waking up to blockchain technology’s benefits of real-time monitoring, auditability and scalability in an era of connected living,” said Frost Sullivan Mobility Research Analyst Meena Subramanian. “Stakeholders all along the value chain are showing great eagerness to harness the power of this technology to achieve best-in-class decentralization, transparency and security.”

Meanwhile, financial divisions in the automotive industry are forming consortiums to frame policies that will help them comply with regulations on a global level. For instance, in 2017 Bosch, Cisco and many start-ups, formed a consortium to build IoT applications based on blockchain technology.

“By 2025, the penetration rate of blockchain technology in functional areas such as retailing leasing, supply chain logistics, mobility solutions, smart manufacturing, connected living IoT is expected to be at ~37.2 percent,” noted Subramanian. “The most successful solution providers will be the ones that create tailored ideas and products that address business requirements, recurring issues, as well as process automotive use cases.”

Blockchain Technology Revolutionizing Automotive Industry is part of Frost Sullivan’s Automotive Transportation Growth Partnership Subscription.

About Frost Sullivan

Frost Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today’s market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion

Blockchain Technology Revolutionizing Automotive Industry
K13A-18

Contact:
Clarissa Castaneda
Corporate Communications – North America
P: 210.477.8481
F: 210.348.1003
E: clarissa.castaneda@frost.com

http://www.frost.com

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/automotive-industry-relies-on-blockchain-platforms-to-enhance-security-in-increasingly-digitized-environment-300464314.html

SOURCE Frost Sullivan

Related Links

http://www.frost.com

Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/automotive-industry-relies-on-blockchain-platforms-to-enhance-security-in-increasingly-digitized-environment-300464314.html

Singapore firms eye opportunities in Czech automotive industry

SINGAPORE: Manufacturing firms from Singapore are exploring opportunities in the Central and Eastern European region, particularly in automotive and aerospace sectors which are strong engines of growth for the local economies.

Representatives from 17 Singapore firms co-led by IE Singapore and Singapore Business Federation have completed a week-long business mission to Poland and the Czech Republic, in conjunction with President Tony Tan Keng Yam’s state visits to these countries. Almost half of the representatives were from the manufacturing industry.

During his state visit to the Czech Republic, President Tan visited Interplex Holdings, a Singapore-headquartered precision engineering firm with a network of more than 40 manufacturing plants located in 13 countries worldwide, and with about 12,000 employees on its books.

Interplex Precision Engineering Czech Republic was established in Pisek, a town in the South Bohemian region of the Czech Republic, in 2000. It currently has 550 employees in its factory, about 10 of whom are Singaporean.

Interplex Holdings CEO Alessandro Perrotta cited key trends that are transforming the automotive industry and driving demand for more sophisticated precision engineering – environmental, connectivity and safety.

“The automotive industry is basically moving from combustion engine to electrical engine,” Mr Perrotta said. “What it means for us is now combining the electrical part with the mechanical part to create an integrated solution known as mechatronics.”

President Tony Tan tours Singapore-headquartered Interplex Holdings factory in Czech Republic. (Photo: Nicole Tan)

Amid the emergence of autonomous cars, Mr Perrotta said car manufacturers need very precise components that can withstand harsh environments, as “the car is making decisions to drive versus us controlling it”.

Citing growth prospects in “Industry 4.0”, referring to the use of smart technology in the manufacturing industry, Mr Perrotta said: “You have to be here. You leverage good proximity of Germany with a low cost manufacturing base, and you’re close to customers here.”

The car industry is a major driver for the Czech economy, accounting for more than 20 per cent of both Czech manufacturing output and Czech exports, according to data from the country’s business and investment development agency Czech Invest.

Latest statistics from Czech Republic’s Automotive Industry Association Auto SAP showed that production and export of cars grew by almost 11 per cent in the first quarter of 2017 compared to the same period a year ago.

To accelerate strengthening of ties between Singapore and Czech Republic economies, new partnerships were signed between IE Singapore and Czech Trade Promotion Agency, Singapore Business Federation and Confederation of Industry of the Czech Republic.

Dr Tan, who witnessed the signing of the partnerships, said that with both countries as gateways into their respective regions, it is important for Singapore and Czech Republic to remain open and expand networks as “fellow small states in an ever-changing environment”.

President Tony Tan tours Singapore-headquartered Interplex Holdings factory in Czech Republic. (Photo: Nicole Tan)

Singapore Business Federation told Channel NewsAsia that Poland and Czech Republic are very strong in automotive engineering, and CEO Ho Meng Kit said these economies are “more competitive” and have lower cost of manpower.

Mr Ho said these markets also provide closer access to the European Union market with about 500 million customers.

Singapore-based manufacturer, Dou Yee Enterprises, which provides materials and equipment for industries including data storage, biomedical, electronic and automobile industries, is part of the business delegation and exploring the possibility of setting up a manufacturing plant in Poland.

President Tham Wai Mun said he visited Czech-headquartered car manufacturer Skoda to gain “market knowledge and insights into its strategy”, as some of Skoda’s suppliers are among Dou Yee’s customer base.

Skoda accounted for more than half of Czech Republic’s automobile production in 2016, according to data from the country’s Automotive Industry Association Auto SAP. The Czech Republic produced a record of more than 1.34 million cars in 2016, up more than 8 per cent compared to the year before.

Article source: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singapore-firms-eye-opportunities-in-czech-automotive-industry-8888430

Big Data in the Automotive Industry: 2017-2030 – $2.8 Billion Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies & Forecasts …

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Research and Markets has announced the addition of SNS
Research’s new report “Big
Data in the Automotive Industry: 2017 – 2030 – Opportunities,
Challenges, Strategies Forecasts”
to their offering.

The Big Data in the Automotive Industry: 2017 – 2030 – Opportunities,
Challenges, Strategies Forecasts report presents an in-depth
assessment of Big Data in the automotive industry including key market
drivers, challenges, investment potential, application areas, use cases,
future roadmap, value chain, case studies, vendor profiles and
strategies.

The report also presents market size forecasts for Big Data hardware,
software and professional services investments from 2017 through to
2030. The forecasts are segmented for 8 horizontal submarkets, 4
application areas, 18 use cases, 6 regions and 35 countries.

Big Data originally emerged as a term to describe datasets whose size is
beyond the ability of traditional databases to capture, store, manage
and analyze. However, the scope of the term has significantly expanded
over the years. Big Data not only refers to the data itself but also a
set of technologies that capture, store, manage and analyze large and
variable collections of data, to solve complex problems.

Amid the proliferation of real-time and historical data from sources
such as connected devices, web, social media, sensors, log files and
transactional applications, Big Data is rapidly gaining traction from a
diverse range of vertical sectors. The automotive industry is no
exception to this trend, where Big Data has found a host of applications
ranging from product design and manufacturing to predictive vehicle
maintenance and autonomous driving.

The author estimates that Big Data investments in the automotive
industry will account for over $2.8 Billion in 2017 alone. Led by a
plethora of business opportunities for automotive OEMs, tier-1
suppliers, insurers, dealerships and other stakeholders, these
investments are further expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 12%
over the next three years.

The report comes with an associated Excel datasheet suite covering
quantitative data from all numeric forecasts presented in the report.

Key Questions Answered

– How big is the Big Data opportunity in the automotive industry?

– How is the market evolving by segment and region?

– What will the market size be in 2020 and at what rate will it grow?

– What trends, challenges and barriers are influencing its growth?

– Who are the key Big Data software, hardware and services vendors and
what are their strategies?

– How much are automotive OEMs and other stakeholders investing in Big
Data?

– What opportunities exist for Big Data analytics in the automotive
industry?

– Which countries, application areas and use cases will see the highest
percentage of Big Data investments in the automotive industry?

Key Findings

– In 2017, Big Data vendors will pocket over $2.8 Billion from hardware,
software and professional services revenues in the automotive industry.
These investments are further expected to grow at a CAGR of
approximately 12% over the next three years, eventually accounting for
over $4 Billion by the end of 2020.

– In a bid to improve customer retention, automotive OEMs are heavily
relying on Big Data and analytics to integrate an array of data-driven
aftermarket services such as predictive vehicle maintenance, real-time
mapping and personalized concierge services.

– In recent years, several prominent partnerships and MA deals have
taken place that highlight the growing importance of Big Data in the
automotive industry. For example, tier-1 supplier Delphi recently led an
investment round to raise over $25 Million for Otonomo, a startup that
has developed a data exchange and marketplace platform for
vehicle-generated data.

– Addressing privacy concerns is necessary in order to monetize the
swaths of Big Data that will be generated by a growing installed base of
connected vehicles and other segments of the automotive industry.

Key Topics Covered:

1: Introduction

2: An Overview of Big Data

3: Big Data Analytics

4: Business Case Applications in the Automotive Industry

5: Automotive Industry Case Studies

6: Future Roadmap Value Chain

7: Standardization Regulatory Initiatives

8: Market Analysis Forecasts

9: Vendor Landscape

10: Conclusion Strategic Recommendations

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pdkbsc/big_data_in_the.

Article source: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170526005338/en/Big-Data-Automotive-Industry-2017-2030---2.8

Trump Threatens German Automotive Industry

Donald Trump has once again come under fire for controversial remarks, with the U.S. President taking aim at Germany’s automotive industry in a recent meeting with EU officials.

In an interview with German magazine Der Spiegel, Trump voiced his frustrations at Germany’s trade surplus with the United States. He described the Germans as “bad, very bad” in regards to international trade and vowed to put a halt to German vehicle imports into the U.S.

“See the millions of cars they sell in the U.S., terrible. We will stop this,” he said.

ALSO SEE: BMW Not Threatened by Trump’s Big Border Tax

Trump threatened to put a 35 percent tariff on German vehicle exports when speaking with German newspaper Bild earlier this year. His desire to curb German vehicle imports is part of a wider reaching plan from the President to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with Germany. Last year, Germany’s trade surplus in 2016 was a record $282.7-billion, the highest ever recorded by the country.

[Source: CNBC]

Article source: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2017/05/latest-trump-remarks-take-aim-at-german-automotive-industry.html

Automotive Industry Relies on Blockchain Platforms to Enhance Security in Increasingly Digitized Environment

To learn more about Frost Sullivan’s research or to sign-up for our Growth Strategy Dialogue, a complimentary one-hour interactive session, with Frost Sullivan thought leaders please visit: https://goo.gl/OtvaKq 

“OEMs are only gradually waking up to blockchain technology’s benefits of real-time monitoring, auditability and scalability in an era of connected living,” said Frost Sullivan Mobility Research Analyst Meena Subramanian. “Stakeholders all along the value chain are showing great eagerness to harness the power of this technology to achieve best-in-class decentralization, transparency and security.”

Meanwhile, financial divisions in the automotive industry are forming consortiums to frame policies that will help them comply with regulations on a global level. For instance, in 2017 Bosch, Cisco and many start-ups, formed a consortium to build IoT applications based on blockchain technology.

“By 2025, the penetration rate of blockchain technology in functional areas such as retailing leasing, supply chain logistics, mobility solutions, smart manufacturing, connected living IoT is expected to be at ~37.2 percent,” noted Subramanian. “The most successful solution providers will be the ones that create tailored ideas and products that address business requirements, recurring issues, as well as process automotive use cases.”

Blockchain Technology Revolutionizing Automotive Industry is part of Frost Sullivan’s Automotive Transportation Growth Partnership Subscription.

About Frost Sullivan

Frost Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today’s market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion

Blockchain Technology Revolutionizing Automotive Industry
K13A-18

Contact:
Clarissa Castaneda
Corporate Communications – North America
P: 210.477.8481
F: 210.348.1003
E: clarissa.castaneda@frost.com

http://www.frost.com

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/automotive-industry-relies-on-blockchain-platforms-to-enhance-security-in-increasingly-digitized-environment-300464314.html

SOURCE Frost Sullivan

Related Links

http://www.frost.com

Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/automotive-industry-relies-on-blockchain-platforms-to-enhance-security-in-increasingly-digitized-environment-300464314.html

Crashworthy Lightweight Material Solution For Automotive Industry

ANN ARBOR, MI — May 25, 2017 — BMW, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), and the University of Delaware-Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) has completed research proving the accuracy of high speed computing for modeling and simulation, to predict the quality and effectiveness of a material that is both lightweight and safety-tested. This effort has demonstrated design, materials, manufacturing, and joining methods for continuous carbon fiber thermoplastics, to meet automotive, industry, and government safety specifications.

This two-year program is a successful government-industry-university partnership that involved regulatory agencies, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), and materials suppliers from the composite industry.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) funded this effort and provided input and guidance throughout the program. NCMS managed the program and ensured target objectives were achieved in a timely manner. Close collaboration with BMW was instrumental in establishing B-pillar performance metrics derived from full-vehicle crash simulations and other design and integrations requirements. UD-CCM provided full range of capabilities in materials selection and evaluation, composite design, analysis and crash simulations, process development and manufacturing, full-scale pillar assembly, and high energy impact testing.

The objective of this study was to investigate the computational tools for the design, optimization, and manufacture of carbon fiber materials for vehicle side frame structures (in this case, B-pillar) subjected to high-velocity side-impact crash loading, and to investigate and demonstrate the appropriateness of simulative methods and tools to adequately predict behavior relevant for the assessment of vehicle safety.

“Using the latest, state-of-the-art tools of high speed computing and data analytics, we have proven the qualities and characteristics of a new lightweight material while maintaining safety requirements in vehicles. In this case, BMW and other automotive companies will benefit but ultimately all industry sectors can use these light, strong, crash-resistant materials for their own manufacturing. And the biggest winner will be the safety of the driving public” NCMS President and CEO Rick Jarman.

“A specific continuous fiber thermoplastic material, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) is a preferred solution for reducing weight while maintaining safety requirements for vehicles. The team used this material to successfully design and impact test a lightweight, all-thermoplastic, continuous carbon fiber composite B-Pillar for automotive applications.” UD-CCM Director Jack Gillespie.

The B-pillar design was spatially optimized for energy absorption, stiffness, and strength while maintaining part producibility and vehicle integration. The resulting B-pillar is 60% lighter than the existing metallic design while meeting BMW safety requirements for the NHTSA FMVSS214 side impact crash.

Benefits discovered include:

Validation of state-of-the-art Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) simulation tools for full vehicle to component impact data. CAE simulations mirrored practical test scenarios.
Development and demonstration of innovative production methods for multi-material parts including infusion and thermoforming tailored blanks with 3 min cycle times.
Development and automation of adhesive bonding methods for dissimilar thermoplastic and steel interfaces.
Achievement of energy savings through a 100% recyclable infusion system with full recovery of the resin and continuous carbon fiber preform possible.
Five (5) full-scale B-pillar assemblies were successfully impact tested under 100% equivalent energy of the side impact crash test scenario at the University of Delaware – Center for Composite Materials demonstrating composite behavior.  All B-pillar test subject performance metrics met or exceeded BMW safety requirements for NHTSA FMVSS214 side impact crash.

Results of this program will be disseminated widely to the automotive industry and the technologies are being evaluated by BMW for future platforms.

Posted May 25, 2017

Source: National Center for Manufacturing Sciences

Article source: http://www.textileworld.com/textile-world/nonwovens-technical-textiles/2017/05/crashworthy-lightweight-material-solution-for-automotive-industry/

UK car industry: Brexit deal among automotive priorities for next …

The UK car industry has put forward five automotive priorities that it wants the next government to address over the next five years – and they include securing continued access to the European single market following Brexit.

The report has been issued by the Society of Motor Manufacturers Traders (SMMT) in the run-up to the general election on 8 June.

As well as reaching a new trade agreement with the European Union (EU), the list includes: ensuring a globally competitive business environment; the development of a long-term industrial strategy that specifically addresses automotive; support for sustainable mobility and ultra-low emission vehicles (ULEVs); and policies to ensure the country benefits from developments in connected mobility.

Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the SMMT, said: “British car manufacturing remains in good health with the production outlook still very positive and significant new models due to go into UK production shortly.

“To guarantee future growth and investment into our industry and its vital supply chain, however, we need the next government to safeguard the conditions that have made us globally competitive, keeping us open and trading and delivering an ambitious industrial strategy for our sector.”

A total of 1.7 million cars were built in the UK in 2016, an increase of 8.5% from 2015 and the highest output since 1999. The automotive industry accounts for 12% of total UK exports.

SMMT reiterates Brexit threat

The SMMT has repeatedly warned of the potential harm to the UK car industry if access to the European single market is not reached post-Brexit. Figures show that 57.5% of cars exported from the UK in 2015 went to the EU, with 81.8% of cars imported into Britain originating from there.

The report cites World Trade Organisation figures that the introduction of a 10% tariff on exports to and from the UK could cost the industry £4.5 billion and add £1500 to the price of every imported car.

The SMMT has also called for the future government to ensure the UK automotive industry has unrestricted access to the EU workforce.

Calls for investment in ULEV infrastructure and incentives

The SMMT’s priorities also call for the future UK government to “take a technologically neutral approach” to reducing carbon and pollutant emissions from vehicles that “allows motorists to choose from the full range of cleaner technologies being offered by the automotive industry”.

There is also a call for the government to develop a long-term strategy to promote the take-up of ULEVs that includes incentives, infrastructure development, consumer acceptance and the development of new battery and fuel technologies.

UK car manufacturing remains strong

The SMMT also released details of UK car manufacturing levels for April. A total of 122,116 cars were made in the UK last month, a decrease of 18.2% from a year ago – although the SMMT noted the late Easter bank holiday affected production.

In the first four months of this year, 593,796 cars have been made – a 1% increase year on year and the highest level since 2000. A 3.5% growth in demand from overseas helped offset a 7% fall in UK sales.

Read more

BMW reiterates Mini pull-out Brexit threat

Brexit: Bentley could shift production to Europe in ‘worst case scenario’ 

Brexit: 77% of UK motor industry want Britain to stay in EU

UK car market hits record high in March

 

Article source: https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/uk-car-industry-brexit-deal-among-automotive-priorities-next-government

The future of the modern car is actually digital – Recode

A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry.


The continuing evolution of the modern automobile is arguably one of the most exciting and most important developments in the tech world today. In fact, it’s probably one of the most important business and societal stories we’ve seen in some time.

The leadership at no less venerable a player than Ford Motor Co. obviously felt the same way — they just replaced their CEO, despite his long-term tenure with the company and the record-setting profits he helped drive during his three-year leadership there. The reason? Not enough progress on advancing the company’s cars forward in the technology domain, particularly with regard to electric vehicles, autonomous driving and new types of transportation service-focused business models.

As has been noted by many, these three capabilities — electrification, autonomy and cars as a service — are considered the key trends driving the auto market today and into the future, at least as far as Wall Street is concerned. In reality, the picture isn’t nearly that simple, but it is clear that tech-industry-driven initiatives are driving the agenda for today’s carmakers. And it’s pushing many of them into uncomfortable positions.

It turns out, however, that in spite of the importance of this critical evolution of automobiles, this is one of those issues that’s a lot harder to overcome than it first appears.

Part of the problem is that as cars have advanced and various technologies have been integrated into them, they’ve evolved into enormously complex machines. Today’s automobiles have as many as 150 programmable computing elements (often called Electronic Control Units, or ECUs), surprisingly large (and heavy) amounts of wiring, numerous different types of electronic signaling and interconnect buses, and up to 100 millions of lines of software, in addition to the thousands of mechanical parts required to run a car. Frankly, it’s somewhat of a miracle that modern cars run as well as they do, although reports of technical glitches and other problems in newer cars do seem to be on the rise.

In addition to the mechanical and computer architecture complexity of the cars themselves, the organizational and business model complexity of today’s car companies and the entire auto supply chain also contribute to the problem. Having evolved over the more than 100-year history of the automotive industry, the system of multiple Tier 1 suppliers, such as Harman, Delphi, Bosch and others, buying components from Tier 2 and Tier 3 suppliers down the chain and car brand OEMs (such as Ford) piecing together multiple subsystems from different combinations of Tier 1s to build their cars is notoriously complex.

But toss in the fact that there are often groups within the carmaker that are specifically responsible for a given ECU (such as, say, heating, air conditioning and other “comfort” controls) and whose jobs may be at risk if someone suggests that the company change to a simpler architecture in which they combined the functionality of multiple ECUs into a smaller, more manageable number and, well, you get the picture.

If ever there was an industry ripe for disruption — and in need of a tech overhaul — the automotive industry is it. That’s why many traditional carmakers are concerned, and why many tech companies are salivating at a chance to get a piece of the multi-trillion-dollar global automotive industry.

It’s also why companies like Tesla have made such a splash. Despite its very modest sales, it is seen as a credible attempt to drive the kind of technological and organizational disruption that many people believe is necessary to transform the automotive industry. In truth, however, because of the inherent and ingrained nature of the auto supply chain, even Tesla has to follow many of the conventions of multiple Tier 1 suppliers, etc., that its rivals use. The problem is that deeply embedded.

But even as those issues get addressed, they are really just a prelude to yet more innovations and opportunities for disruption. Like many modern computing devices — and, to be clear, that’s what today’s cars have become — the technological and business model for autos is slowly but surely moving toward a software-and-services-focused approach. In other words, we’re moving toward the software-defined “digital car.”

In order for that to happen, several key challenges need to be addressed. Most importantly, major enhancements in automotive security — both through architectural changes and software-driven advances — have to occur. The potential for life-threatening problems if either standard or autonomous cars get hacked should make this point painfully obvious.

Connectivity options, speed and reliability also have to be improved, and that’s where industry-wide efforts like 5G and specific products from vendors like Qualcomm and Intel can make a difference.

Finally, car companies and critical suppliers need to figure out the kinds of services that consumers will be willing to pay for and deliver platforms and architectures that can enable them. Like many other types of hardware devices, profit margins on cars are not very large, and with the increasing amount of technology they’re going to require, they could even start to shrink. As a result, car companies need to think through different ways of generating income.

Thankfully, a number of tech startups and established vendors, such as Harman, are working on creating cloud-based platform delivery systems for automotive services that are expected to start bringing these capabilities to life over the next several years.

As with any major transition, the move to a digital car model won’t be easy, fast or bump-free, but it’s bound to be an interesting ride.


Bob O’Donnell is the founder and chief analyst of Technalysis Research LLC, a technology consulting and market research firm that provides strategic consulting and market research services to the technology industry and professional financial community. Reach him @bobodtech.


Article source: https://www.recode.net/2017/5/23/15681058/digital-car-automotive-industry-software-designed-disruption

The Future Automotive Supply Chain

The automotive industry is changing faster now than at any time in its history.

The technology making autonomous driving and connected cars possible also is changing the way cars are built, where their components are sourced and how the supply chains are managed.

A premium car today may have 50 computers and 100 million lines of code. That’s four times more code than an F-35 fighter jet.

Working closely with automakers and suppliers, and having witnessed firsthand the rise in prominence of strategic supply-chain management, we believe several key trends will emerge:

  • Data integration will make logistics a cohesive element of the manufacturing process, allowing more customization with no impact on lead times.
  • The need to accommodate more bespoke orders will intensify the need for responsiveness, which means logistics providers and suppliers must be able to accommodate very late changes.
  • A greater level of visibility will be required to enable customization without jeopardizing robustness of supply.

But what will cars be like? Will they still be as complex as today, requiring a complex supply chain, or will they be simpler electric vehicles with fewer components and less need for big supply chains? And how will data in the cloud and the Internet of Things be best utilized?

First, Industry 4.0 is becoming a commonly used phrase, and technological advances already are driving generic supply-chain changes across all manufacturing industries. The key opportunity that exists – and the direction in which the industry is headed – is the use of cloud data to link the supply chain, so the entire supply chain becomes a single, integrated global manufacturing operation, rather than discrete operations joined by logistics, enabling a lot more to happen in real-time. The emergence of “Smart Factories” is dependent on the implementation of “Smart Logistics,” which provides real-time analysis of supply routes – such as potential bottlenecks – and the ability to react immediately to changes in demand, inventories and manufacturing and logistics capacity.

Such trends point to the need for more premium freight, more expertise, more flexibility, more responsiveness, more contingency planning and more strategic use of built-in emergency logistics as a proactive safeguard of highly responsive, high-risk supply-chain operations.

That same operational alignment and tightening of supply-chain integration also will be felt during production launch and ramp-up. Our critical projects specialists already are helping vehicle manufacturers that have needed to push back tooling delivery due to late changes.

With more and more engineering validation now committed to computers, we have to help our customers compress their timescales in new ways so changes can be made later than they thought possible, without any impact on production schedules.

The industry already is experiencing heightened time compression, with more new models launched more frequently in a shorter timeframe than ever before, with some automakers offering near-bespoke levels of trim interchangeability on best-selling models.

Social media and emerging digital retail systems now promote pre-selling of vehicles even before cars have reached showrooms, so vehicle buyers have a promise of a delivery date that cannot be missed before showrooms are prepared, sales staff trained and sales targets set.

A vital enabler and the technological safety net of a data-immersed future supply chain will be software such as Block Chain, which reduces risk by providing a safer virtual working environment for automakers, suppliers and logistics providers while offering real-time updates of every step of the process.

Fundamentally, the supply chain always will rely on components leaving one location and arriving at another – we just have to ensure this process is as swift and foolproof as possible.

Brad Brennan is managing director of Evolution Time Critical, a Metro Supply Chain Group Company that specializes in the provision of emergency logistics expertise to the global automotive industry. Evolution Time Critical operates control centers throughout Europe and in Atlanta, GA. 

Article source: http://wardsauto.com/industry/future-automotive-supply-chain