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The first new Ford Mustang Bullitt just sold for $300000

You’ll need a big wad of cash to buy Ford’s new Mustang Bullitt, as the first model of the special edition car has sold at auction for a hefty $300,000.

That’s around £215,000, a sum that would get you a new Aston Martin D11, any of Porsche’s 911 cars, and a decent flat outside of London.

Now Ford hasn’t officially announced the pricing of the Mustang Bullitt and the first car was sold through a charity auction, according to Slashgear, so the price was arguably artificially inflated somewhat.

But even with that in mind we doubt the Mustang Bullitt will be anywhere near the price tag of the car it’s based on, the Mustang GT.

While the Mustang Bullitt adds two custom paint jobs, tweaked handling and performance, and a more sophisticated styling to the base Mustang GT, the difference between the original car and the special edition are not miles apart.

However, special editions of such cars are made in limited numbers and can retain and even increase their value, as the pool of available models dries up. As such, for people with deep enough pockets and a strong love of American muscle cars and Steve McQueen films, the Mustang Bullitt could almost be seen as a form of investment.

That’s providing the buyers have the driving skills to keep the Mustang Bullitt’s 5.0-litre V8 in check and ensure the some 475 horsepower it’s estimated to produce can be kept on the road and not wrapped around a tree or in a ditch.

If that sounds a bit intense, there were a slew of other cars revealed at the Detroit Auto Show 2018, which could take your fancy this year and beyond.

Related: Samsung Galaxy S9 release

How much would you pay for a Mustang Bullitt if money was no object? Let us know on our Facebook page or tweet @TrustedReviews.

Article source: http://www.trustedreviews.com/news/ford-mustang-bullitt-2019-price-3380509

Porsche Macan GTS review: the best SUV in its range comes at a price

Sport is a grossly overused term when describing cars, but is perhaps at its most abused when it comes to the Sport Utility Vehicle. Using “sport” is, after all, supposed to imply a sense of a car being light and nimble, where as we all know that SUVs tend to be heavy and cumbersome.

Despite this, even the most ardent SUV cynic would surely find it tricky not to be impressed by the Porsche Macan. Yes, it is a heavy and high-riding car, but it also seems to defeat the laws of physics with its deft handling and superb body control, while still offering the high driving position and rugged styling that people find so appealing about cars of this type.

On the downside the Macan is not the roomiest SUV in its class. For a start it gets only five seats rather than the seven of the Land Rover Discovery Sport, and even when you compare it with other five-seaters such as the Audi Q5 or BMW X3 you’ll…

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/porsche/porsche-macan-gts-review-true-sport-utility-vehicle/

Jaguar E-Pace review: Jag’s small diesel SUV driven

£5,000£350,000

Article source: https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/jaguar/e-pace/20d-240-r-dynamic-se-5dr-auto/first-drive

Porsche 718 Boxster (2018) review: all the sports car you need?

► Boggo Porsche 718 Boxster driven
► Is the non-S model the one to go for?
► Entry-level Boxster yours from £41k

The Porsche 718 Boxster can now be had in three states of tune: standard, S and GTS. In early 2016, oversteer merchant Ben Barry said that the S was the pick of the range, but how does the entry-level roadster stack up?

We grabbed the keys to a ‘basic’ 718 Boxster, complete with a six-speed manual, to see what the fuss is about.

Is the 2018 Porsche 718 Boxster fast?

A 5.1-second 0-62mph time says yes, but the boosty nature of the engine and bassy note coming out of the back makes that acceleration figure rather flattering.

That’s no bad thing, mind – the basic 718 still has 296bhp under its belt from the turbocharged flat-four. Mid-range torque is plentiful when you’re on the boost – enough to easily let the powered wheels slip in less-than-ideal conditions. Sport mode still has the traction control activated, but allows you a little sideways fun before reeling you back in again.

Porsche 718 Boxster leaves

But nobody buys a Boxster for outright speed, right? They buy it because it’s a Porsche, and therefore handles well…

Go on then, let’s talk Boxster handling

Porsche has this department completely licked. The ride is supple at a cruise and while Sport mode does firm the suspension up, it’s not bone-shattering. Body control is kept to an impressive minimum and no matter where, how or when you’re driving, all of the controls feel positive espousing a detailed rapport with your hands and feet.

The steering has a gorgeous weighting to it and is pin-sharp, throttle response is accurate and the six-speed manual ‘box is a delight to use. The clutch and gearlever are both heavy, but that makes it so much more involving. This is a tactile sports car.

Porsche 718 Boxster front

Our only niggles would be that the clutch pedal travel feels a smidge too long and we’d like stronger brakes. Whether or not we’d recommend speccing the five thousand pound carbon ceramics is an entirely different story…

That engine note, though…

Yes… yes… ‘it’s not a flat-six wail’… blah blah. The cruellest among you will say it sounds like a sickly Beetle, but you have to remember that plenty of classic Porsches (914, anyone?) have been powered by flat-fours.

Plus, we quite like the noise. Granted it has none of the top-end charisma of the old six-banger, but it’s still got tonnes of character and, if nothing else, sounds unique in the sports car class.

Tell me about the entry-level Porsche 718 Boxster’s interior

You know that old saying: ‘If you drive a Boxster it’s because you couldn’t afford a 911’? From the driver’s seat that aged trope means nothing – the Boxster’s interior is almost exactly the same of that of its bigger, more powerful brother.

Porsche 718 Boxster interior

You’re welcomed by a large, thinly-rimmed steering wheel, analogue instruments, a high centre console and a cocooned driving position. Space is tight, but there are a few clever cubbies hidden in the door inlays and centre console.

The infotainment is a little last-gen; the screen looks small and low-res from your eyeline and you need agile wrists to reach around the gearlever, but it’s easy to use and still comes with a decent level of connectivity options.

Can I fit people and things?

You’re reading the wrong review.

Yeah but, seriously…

Well, the frunk is deep enough for a couple of small suitcases, the glovebox is a good size and there are a couple of cupholders hidden behind a panel on the passenger’s side, but there’s little else that a small drop-top sports car can offer. Get used to having no friends.

Verdict

It might be the cheapest, least powerful member of the Porsche convertible family, but you really shouldn’t write it off.

The 718 Boxster is still a brilliant machine to drive. All of the controls are positive in your hand, so much so that you get out of every drive with a smile on your face – and your 911-owning mates won’t be able to tell the difference when they climb inside.

We’d still pick the Boxster S for a bit more shove, but the simplicity of Porsche’s basic baby drop-top is alluring nonetheless.

Check out our Porsche reviews

Porsche 718 Boxster rear tracking

Article source: http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/car-reviews/porsche/porsche-718-boxster-2018-review/

2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk First Test Review: Power Mad

No Obligation, Fast Simple Free New Car Quote

There’s a line from Moby-Dick, “In a whaler wonders soon wane.” Cetaceans are awesome creatures, magnificent mammalian consequences of evolution. Awesome, in the older, proper sense of the word. And in a life spent in their pursuit, so filled was it with wonder, the whaler soon grew immune to unsubduable excitement. As much as I try and not let myself get numb to the routine of driving fantastic dream machinery, it happens.

So imagine my surprise when, leaving Motor Trend HQ one afternoon, I floored the Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk and found myself laughing like a fool for 30 seconds straight. Mind you, I only floored the big, red Jeep for about three seconds, but that was enough to make me giggle and guffaw for 10 times as long. I wasn’t in Sport mode or Track mode, and I wasn’t using launch control.

As Jimi Hendrix would term it, I am experienced. Experienced with both powerful and crazy. The AMG 6×6 jumps to mind, as does the Lamborghini Urus, the Lamborghini LM002, the BMW X6 M, and even a good old Unimog. I’ve also driven a number of cars with 700-plus horsepower; heck, I had a Dodge Charger Hellcat for a year. Until recently, however, I’d never driven an SUV with 700-plus horsepower.

Well, live long enough, and you’ll see everything. Including the new Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, the family SUV with a 707-horsepower 6.2-liter supercharged V-8 under the hood. Crazy? By design. It’s refreshing, both personally and professionally, to get whomped over the head by something as utterly ridiculous as the Trackhawk. But is it any good?

I had been in the Trackhawk’s driver’s seat for maybe a minute and just buried my right foot. To brag a little, I’ve hit 171 mph on the front straight of Big Willow in a Porsche 918 and hit 193 mph on the Bonneville salt in an AMG GT S. I’m used to big machines doing big things. But none of them tickled my funny bone like this $100,960 Jeep. I haven’t laughed about a car like that since … I don’t remember.

What’s it feel like? Well, some of the giggles come from how it launches the opposite of a Hellcat. Perhaps not what you’d expect because the two vehicles sport the same engines, same power, and nearly the same torque (645 versus 650 lb-ft). The thing is, although the Hellcat is both a Pirelli shareholder’s best friend and a smoke machine, the Trackhawk—by virtue of all-wheel drive—puts all that screaming supercharged fury down to the pavement. The big Jeep also lurches back on its haunches in a fun but startling way. For a brief moment, it feels as if the Trackhawk’s beak is pointed at the sun. The adaptive Bilsteins are actually fairly stiff (and would be stiffer still if I’d been in Track mode), but with 70 percent of the power hitting the rear wheels, thanks to a fixed torque split, this Jeep is going to lean back when launching.

How does this thing handle? Another reminiscence if I may. Since I’ve driven the Porsche 918, I inevitably get asked how it is to drive. “Fast,” I say. “It’s just fast.” Meaning, I know that I drove four laps around the big track at Willow Springs, but I literally remember nothing about the 889-hp hybrid hypercar, save for how fast it is. Nada. Same is true for the Trackhawk, only in terms of initial acceleration. I know I took some corners in it, but the bulk of my memory comes from that first launch. It’s just so brutally quick that I know I drove the Jeep aggressively on a curvy road, but I just can’t get past the fury of leaving from a dead stop. Speaking of which …

The Trackhawk hit 60 mph in 3.3 seconds in our testing, beating Jeep’s claimed time of 3.5 seconds. The quickest we’ve ever hit 60 mph in Hellcat testing is 3.7 seconds, for both the Challenger and the Charger (both were eight-speed autos—we’ve never tested a manual). For SUVs, the quickest to 60 mph we tested before the Trackhawk were Tesla Model X (3.2 seconds), the Bentley Bentayga (3.5 seconds), the BMW X6 M (3.7 seconds) and the Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S Coupe 4Matic (3.9). Lamborghini is claiming 3.7 seconds to 60 mph for the 650-hp Urus, though I think we’ll see 3.4. Discounting the instant-on torque of the Tesla, so far, so good for the Trackhawk.

But right now is as good a time as any to mention one little caveat: We weighed the Trackhawk, and the results aren’t pretty—5,448 pounds. That’s a lot of SUV. That AMG, for instance—which coincidently shares the same underpinnings as the Trackhawk, the last remnants of DaimlerChrysler—weighs nearly 100 pounds less (5,359 pounds). The X6 M comes in at a relatively trim 5,187 pounds. All of which makes the Trackhawk’s acceleration that much more crazy.

To continue that conversation, in the quarter-mile test, the Trackhawk runs 11.7 seconds at 116.2 mph. Did you ever think we’d see the day when a production SUV runs the quarter in the 11s? That’s just crazy! Or should I say ludicrous, as the Model X when in Ludicrous mode also runs an 11.7-second quarter mile. However, the Trackhawk’s trap speed is 0.2 mph higher than the Model X’s, so Jeep beats Tesla in a drag race. What a world. Speaking of 11s, the 600-horsepower Bentayga runs 11.9 seconds at 117.1 mph. Some other fast SUVs for you to consider: the X6 M, but that slowpoke took 12.1 seconds at 114.3 mph. The quickest we’ve ever seen a four-door Hellcat run is 11.8 seconds at 124.3 mph. Meaning the Jeep is quicker, but the extra 900 pounds of lard and AWD hardware slows it down in terms of velocity, hence the 8-mph gap at the end of 1,320 feet. The quickest two-door Hellcat ties the Trackhawk at 11.7 seconds, but its trap is higher still at 125.4 mph.  The Challenger Hellcat just happens to weigh 999 pounds less than the Trackhawk. (That’s 666 if you invert—coincidence or conspiracy?) Just to further impress upon you how quick this Jeep is, the Corvette Grand Sport hits 60 mph in 3.9 seconds and runs the quarter mile in 12.2 at 116.1 mph. Moreover, the 650-hp Camaro ZL1 with the 10-speed auto hits 60 mph in 3.5 seconds and runs the quarter mile in 11.5 seconds at 125.0. This Jeep is straight-line legit.

The Trackhawk’s stopping power is neither great nor terrible—108 feet from 60 mph , not supercar distances but impressive given its ample heft. The figure eight is another story. The time itself is solid: 24.7 seconds, which happens to tie the single Challenger Hellcat. We’ve tested three different Charger Hellcats and have seen 24.4, 24.5, and 24.6 seconds. Meaning this big Jeep can hustle. The experience, however, is more of a mixed bag. “I just about put my foot through the floor on the first lap because the stopping power wasn’t what I was expecting from the Brembos and P Zeros,” road test editor Chris Walton said. “Granted, it’s a heavy mutha, and it goes across the middle of the course at 79 mph, but I really had to back up the brake zone by about three Jeep lengths to make the corner of the skidpad.

“Once there, it turns in rather slowly, offers only a little hint of the front tires’ punishment, and eventually settles into terminal understeer,” he continued. “The exit, however, is where the ‘Wheeeeee’ happens. You can literally stand on the loud pedal and do a four-wheel drift until it’s pointing straight. Then it simply goes like stink. Finally, all-wheel drive to make use of all that Hellcat horsepower and torque that can’t be fully utilized in either the Challenger or Charger.”

I completely agree with Chris on that last point. I got bored of having to change tires on our long-term Hellcat. Simply put, the 707-hp barcalounger couldn’t put its prodigious power to the ground. This supercharged super Jeep sure can.

Before the Trackhawk, if you would have told me that one day there will be a $100,000-plus Jeep, I would have assumed it would have been some sort of luxurious, reborn Grand Wagoneer—complete with the off-road chops the fabled brand is known for. I never would have seen a dragstrip bruiser in the cards. Yet here we are. I’m sure we can all agree that there’s no need for a vehicle like this. But boy, are we all happy Jeep gave it the green light. I got no problem with crazy, as long as it’s the good kind of crazy. You know, the kind that makes a supercar saturated car scribe giggle like a todder. Ain’t no wonder waning here.

Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/jeep/grand-cherokee/2018/2018-jeep-grand-cherokee-trackhawk-first-test-review/

Mercedes-Benz GLC Coupe review: Does it blend? – Pocket

Mid-sized SUVs have become hugely popular over the past few years – particularly at the premium end of the market, if they’re wearing the right German badge. The Mercedes GLC Coupe is most certainly wearing a badge of desire. But yes, you read that right, we added the word “coupe” onto the end of GLC – the name of Merc’s mid-sized SUV. Say what?

Where Mercedes didn’t engineer its last GLK for right-hand drive, when it replaced it with the GLC in 2015, it didn’t make the same mistake. It’s a great SUV, one of our favourites in the class, vying for leadership with the Volvo XC60 and Land Rover Discovery Sport.

There are apparently people who don’t want the full-on, family-tastic, practical SUV. Those who like the idea of the general size, driving position and feel of that type of car – but desire to have something that bit more slinky-looking. That type of car is called a Coupe-SUV.

SUV and coupe. They’re not two words you would normally put together. An SUV is a high-riding, utility product with space for all the family and (supposedly) the ability to go off-road. A coupe is (typically) a two-door, low-riding sporty number, which often doesn’t even have four seats and prioritises driving fun and sporty looks over practicality. Cross the two, and you get this. But does it work?

Pocket-lint

To get specific, the GLC Coupe takes one GLC SUV, and all its sensible premium-SUV qualities, lowers it about 10mm and then grafts on a roofline that’s distinctly un-SUV and every bit a coupe. That roofline means you lose 50 litres of space in the boot. And you only get two seats in the back, rather than the normal three-across bench.

Mercedes didn’t invent this new type of car (the honour arguably goes to BMW, with its X6), but it has got form in inventing new genres – remember the first CLS, the the first four-door coupe? The company is hoping the GLC Coupe can have the same success and be the prime representation of a new high-riding, sloping-roof SUV genre.

In the two weeks since the GLC coupe left our driveway, we’ve been trying to work out why the coupe version, in our opinion, doesn’t feel quite as successful as the regular GLC SUV.

We think it comes down to this: that SUV-mixed-with-coupe thing creates a visual contradiction. We see an offroad-style vehicle that’s high up, that looks aggressive, that should be practical, spacious and have a certain utility. But we see it’s got a coupe roofline, which means it should be sporty, quick and good fun to drive.

Pocket-lint

And yet the GLC Coupe isn’t a great half-way house between either of these two worlds. It isn’t as practical as a regular GLC. That’s fine, we can appreciate there are people who don’t have families and don’t need the space. But the GLC isn’t remotely sporty or fun to drive in the manner of a coupe, either. It’s refined, it’s comfortable and the front cabin is good, but the GLC Coupe is never an exciting thing to jump behind the wheel of, and whizz off down the road. A Porsche Macan, or BMW X is a much better drive.

We’re not going to try and argue the GLC Coupe looks bad though. Compared to its main rival – the BMW X4 – the Merc’s design is nicely resolved, in objective terms. That roofline flows into the rear deck neatly, while the rear aspect borrows the lamp arrangement from Mercedes’ coupe car line with success.

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Our AMG Line specification review car has trim that is quite showy – there are chrome eyebrows above the rear lamps, the OTT running boards reflect in the body side, the massive multi-spoke AMG wheels and bright star grille give feel designed for Dubai. But it’s just ostentatious in the dreary English midlands. Undoubtedly it’s what people want though – over 50 per cent of UK buyers go for AMG Line spec, more still pick the Premium Plus Pack (£2,795), which nets you yet more tinsel.

Luckily, if you’re of a more demure disposition, much of this is optional. A regular AMG-line GLC Coupe does without the Night Package with all the black glossy bits (£495), 20-inch wheels (£595) and running boards (£450). Step it down a level further, speccing Sport, to takes the chrome off altogether and leave you with a much visually calmer GLC Coupe.

Inside, the setup for driver and passenger is impressive. The interior carries over from the regular GLC, which is itself related to the C-Class interior. These Mercedes interiors knock those of BMW – and increasingly Audi, too – into touch for their perceived quality.

So long as you like a bit of shininess, the cockpit is a visual treat – and most things you touch feels top class. Metal-look items feel cold, and things that move or slide do so with a damped, well-oiled precision; even the air vents move around with a certain counter-weighted smooth movement.

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Our test car came with the dark, open-pore ash wood interior, which we’d pick over the black gloss option every day of the week, because it looks like genuine wood, is finished like modern furniture, and doesn’t pick up fingerprints.

It’s not all perfect, though. The driving position forces your feet to twist slightly outwards, because the transmission tunnel intrudes into the footwell. And we can’t understand why the infotainment shortcut buttons on the console feel so cheap to press when everything around them feels so high quality.

Those buttons are also a bit of an ergonomic fail – your hand having to jump between here and the rotary controller between the seats. That controller isn’t as intuitive as the BMW or Audi versions either – it’s over-complicated, with the touchpad on top being hyper-sensitive and too easy to accidentally mis-hit.

Plus there’s no touchscreen functionality – something BMW now offers – and no digital cockpit, which BMW, Audi and Merc’s own larger vehicles, such as the E-Class, all feature. If you’ve had a Mercedes before, however, then this is unlikely to bother you. The 8.4-inch touchscreen of the Comand interface is slick and high resolution, and there’s a certain interface logic which is of the brand (seat controls on the doors, gearshifter on the steering column, wiper speed selection on the end of the indicator stalk).

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The back seat accommodation isn’t as bad as you might think looking at the car from outside. A six-foot driver can sit behind themselves, and while they’re not going to be in rapture, they can sit there just about happily – head brushing but not being crushed by the roof lining. Credit must go to Merc’s designers for getting that roofline to work while still allowing space for normal people in the back. Legroom isn’t unreasonable either. Instead, the price you pay for going for a coupe GLC is that only two seatbelts live in the back – if you want to carry a fifth passenger you’re out of look.

The electrically operated boot lid conceals a boot that is reasonably deep and square, but notably more shallow than the GLC SUV. What’s also notable is that from the driver’s seat, looking in the rear view mirror, the design of the rear deck is very high – the GLC is tricky to see out of rearwards when manoeuvring. Luckily our test car came with a reversing and surround camera system (for a not unreasonable £335).

Our GLC 250d 4Matic AMG Line Coupe (now breathe) came in at £43,695 before options. That’s not too bad for what you get. Artico (read: synthetic) leather, electric tailgate, LED lamps, keyless start, AMG body kit, collision prevention system, a 7-inch multimedia display with Garmin mapping and DAB, plus 19-inch wheels are all standard. The kicker is that you pay more for less, as a GLC 250d SUV of equivalent spec is £40,595.

Pocket-lint

The best option to tick from the options list, if you’re going to delve into it, is undoubtedly the Premium Plus Pack. It’s £2,795 and gets you the upgraded 8.4-inch Comand media system with an integrated hard disk, live traffic info, Mercedes’ app eco-system and WLAN hotspot. As well as that, there’s Merc’s lovely Burmester 13-speaker stereo system, with its intricate speaker grilles and impressive sound, along with a sunroof, electric memory seats, full comfort access (keyless car, plus kick-to-open boot and ambient lighting).

That 360-degree camera system is very useful given the difficulty we had seeing out, while Mercedes’ full Safety Assist Suite (£1,695) is another option box we’d be happy to tick if splashing out. Although notably, we found the Distronic plus system – which steers the car within its lane at certain speeds – notably more wayward than Tesla’s Autopilot or Volvo’s Pilot Assist. The distance control, blind spot system and traffic sign recognition stuff all worked without fault though.

One option on our test car, which undoubtedly makes a big difference, is the £1,495 air body control suspension system. This helps the car ride with the kind of suppleness that belies its 20-inch wheels, and also neatly handle corners without too much body roll. But the air suspension setup means you feel quite disconnected from the action. You’d never call the GLC Coupe fun to drive. In the regular GLC, we forgive this easily, as we feel it’s pitched right. We expected a bit more of the GLC Coupe. 

The version we tested came with the 250d engine configuration, making 201hp. That’s connected to a smooth-shifting 9-speed automatic gearbox and puts its power to the road through all four wheels (hence the 4Matic moniker). The engine is the old 2.2-litre unit, rather than the new 2.0 found in the E-Class, and it’s noticeably less refined, getting shrill at high revs. The performance is impressive for a big car, though, because there’s loads of torque from low revs. We managed 41mpg on test – the figure was hovering in the low 30s until the last day of our time with the car, when we spent 150 miles on the motorway with it.

Pocket-lint

There’s a less powerful 220d version, too, plus a more powerful 350d powered by a V6 diesel – which will be notably smoother. If you want a petrol GLC coupe, then for now you’ll need a fire breathing 43 or 63 AMG petrol version (and a bigger wallet).

Overall, then, the GLC doesn’t feel as sporty or as fun as a Porsche Macan, isn’t as car-like and easy to drive as an Audi Q5, and lacks the hefty, commanding sense you get from a Discovery Sport. It is refined (despite the diesel engine getting loud when extended), but above all it excels at being comfortable.

Verdict

When we drove the GLC SUV after its launch, we felt it stood a chance of being rated as the best car in the class. Since then, the Audi Q5, Volvo XC60, and (just) BMW X3 have all been replaced. None of these cars are perfect, and if the GLC has a core quality, it’s that it has no obvious or significant flaw.

Yet it doesn’t do anything in a way that leads the class – with the exception perhaps of interior design ambience and perceived quality. There will be some for whom only a Mercedes will do, and we’d happily recommend a GLC… SUV. Throw the “Coupe” bit into the mix as we’ve got here and it’s much less clear who the car is for, with what it competes, or what the rationale is for paying more for less car.

Ultimately the GLC Coupe is a car that we’ve struggled to bond with. When we tried to use it in a way similar to the GLC SUV, with family in tow, it was clearly more compromised. But then when we drove it alone, it felt big and cumbersome – and we couldn’t help feeling that any number of cars would have provided us with a better drive, been more fun and connected.

What the GLC Coupe does do, however, is provide you with all the core qualities of any Mercedes: solidity, reliability, refinement, a great cabin and the sophisticated image that goes with the badge. The higher driving position and less utility-orientated roofline (and image) won’t be without appeal to some people. Especially if you’ve not got kids, loads of stuff or dogs to lug around.

Overall we feel the Coupe lacks the sophisticated class of many Mercedes vehicles past and present, and we can’t help feeling a GLC SUV offers more. It’s far from a bad car, but the GLC Coupe proves that adding SUV and Coupe together creates a bit of a strange blend.

Pocket-lint

Without doubt the leader of the pack at this end of the market when it comes to driving thrills. The Macan starts at £45k, while the diesel S version is £48k. You’ll easily spend £10k on options without thinking, mind, and the rear seat space is tighter than the GLC Coupe too. But the Macan has a better packaged boot, barely depreciates because it’s in such demand, and is our number one choice of sporting SUV.

Read the full article: Porsche Macan review

The X4 represents the GLC Coupe’s most direct competition. The X4 is a coupe-SUV based on its sister car the X3. As that car has just been replaced, the X4 now represents rather outdated technology (the new X3 sits on a new platform) and, in many ways, that shows when you compare it to the GLC. Still, it’s got an interface that’s easier to use, some great engine options and is that bit more spritely to drive than the Mercedes, shrinking around the driver and at least giving some credence to the sporty bit that the coupe roofline implies.

Read the full article: BMW X4 first drive

Article source: https://www.pocket-lint.com/cars/reviews/mercedes-benz/143138-mercedes-benz-glc-coupe-review-does-it-blend

PHOTOS! Cars of the 2018 Detroit Auto Show

2. Contact Info


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Article source: http://www.motortrend.com/news/car-photos-2018-detroit-auto-show/

2018 Porsche Macan Turbo Review: Sports Car On Stilts

– Los Angeles, California

Believe it or not, there are still people in this world who hate the idea of the Macan. “It’s not a real Porsche!” You’ve no doubt heard this before. But I’m telling you, the Macan is as much a proper Porsche as any other car in the company’s lineup. And it takes about 15 minutes behind the wheel to realize that.

That’s especially true with the range-topping Macan Turbo. A potent biturbo V6 offers tremendous power, and underneath that functional body, there’s a wonderful chassis, exquisitely tuned to make this one of the best-driving SUVs on the road today. As for this version, equipped with the Performance Pack… well, let’s just call it a Macan Turbo S. It’s an absolute gem.

Of course, it’s not perfect. As you’ll read in the sections below, the Macan’s performance and luxury come at a big cost. My gut tells me this car deserves at least a 9/10 rating, but in the context of all SUVs – even luxury ones – the Turbo’s incredible performance can’t completely make up for its high cost and low fuel economy.

Surprise, surprise: a not-cheap Porsche. Macan models start as low as $47,800, or $55,400 for the S, which are actually pretty competitive within the luxury crossover segment. But for the privilege of owning the Turbo, you need at least $77,200, and this Performance Pack car starts at $87,700.

That’s before you dig into the options sheet, of course. This nicely equipped Turbo adds carbon ceramic brakes ($8,150), Porsche’s Torque Vectoring Plus system ($1,490), Carmine Red paint ($3,120), and more. The final, as-tested price? $114,840, including $1,050 for destination and handling. Eek.

A lot of people say the Macan looks like a seven-eighths version of the Cayenne, but I have to ask, is that such a bad thing? I love the slope of the roofline, the chiseled front end, and the super clean rear (it looks even better with the badge delete option). This car has the $7,920 Turbo Exterior Package, which gets you these 21-inch wheels, LED headlights, black air intakes, a body-colored roof spoiler, black side blades, black sport exhaust tips, and more. An expensive kit, to be sure, and to be honest, the Macan Turbo looks just as great without it. Line this CUV up against a Mercedes GLC or Audi Q5, and to my eye, it’s the prettiest of the bunch.

I’ll admit, the sheer number of buttons on the Macan’s center stack is overwhelming at first blush, but live with the car for a week, and you get used to it. In fact, I enjoy the fact that there are physical buttons for everything – no car systems hidden in infotainment menus, everything clearly labeled. That aside, the Macan’s cabin uses a simple, easy-to-navigate layout, with a small gauge cluster, infotainment screen front and center, and only a few steering wheel-mounted controls.

It’s a nice place to spend time, too. Front seats are electronically adjustable in all directions, and side bolsters on the seat backs and bottoms can be positioned to your exact liking, as well. The seats themselves are super comfortable and supportive – you won’t suffer fatigue after hours of driving.

Unfortunately, the rear bench only offers okay amounts of head- and legroom, and cargo space tops out at just 53 cubic feet with the seats folded, which is on the smaller side of average. There are certainly roomier alternatives to be had in the premium CUV space.

The Macan’s infotainment system earns high marks for its high-resolution graphics and easy-to-use interface. Everything is clearly labeled and simple to navigate, with instantaneous response, and even features a proximity sensor that enlarges buttons as it notices your finger approaching. Plus, the optional Porsche Connect Plus system ($1,300) turns the car into a wifi hotspot. Porsche offers Apple CarPlay compatibility as standard, though Android Auto isn’t available.

The only demerit here is the relatively small screen size. Yes, there’s a secondary display on the right side of the gauge cluster, but in a time when 12-inch screens are quickly becoming the new norm for luxury cars, the Macan’s 7-inch center display looks decidedly small by comparison.

As you’d expect from any car with “Porsche” and “Turbo” in its name, this Macan is a superstar on the road. This Performance Pack model adds an extra 40 horsepower and 36 pound-feet of torque to the already potent Macan Turbo, for final output numbers of 440 hp and 442 lb-ft.

But it’s not just about numbers or straight-line speed (0-60 in 4.2 seconds, by the way). The Macan deserves high marks for its incredible balance and composure, even on winding roads. The steering is nicely weighted, with lots of great feedback. There’s little body roll while cornering. The ride quality is superb, even on these huge 21-inch wheels. I’d probably be just as happy driving a less expensive Macan GTS, but there’s no arguing that the Turbo is a standout performer amongst premium crossovers.

Macan Turbo models come standard with blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, and adaptive cruise control, among other niceties. But it lacks any active collision prevention/mitigation technology or semi-autonomous features. Porsche will soon offer its new InnoDrive driver assistance tech on the 2018 Panamera and 2019 Cayenne, and it’ll hopefully make its way down to the Macan in the crossover’s next generation.

EPA ratings for the Macan Turbo come in at 17 miles per gallon city, 23 highway, and 19 combined, which, these days, are pretty low. Plus, if you’re like me, you’ll be digging into the throttle on a regular basis to get the most out of this really great-driving package – expect to see real-world fuel economy numbers in the high teens. And remember, the Macan only sips premium fuel, so there’s a slight cost penalty every time you visit the pump. A small price to pay for something that’s so sweet to drive.

 

Photos: Steven Ewing / Motor1.com

Article source: https://www.motor1.com/reviews/227030/2018-porsche-macan-turbo/

2018 Porsche Macan Turbo Review: Sports Car On Stilts – Motor1.com

– Los Angeles, California

Believe it or not, there are still people in this world who hate the idea of the Macan. “It’s not a real Porsche!” You’ve no doubt heard this before. But I’m telling you, the Macan is as much a proper Porsche as any other car in the company’s lineup. And it takes about 15 minutes behind the wheel to realize that.

That’s especially true with the range-topping Macan Turbo. A potent biturbo V6 offers tremendous power, and underneath that functional body, there’s a wonderful chassis, exquisitely tuned to make this one of the best-driving SUVs on the road today. As for this version, equipped with the Performance Pack… well, let’s just call it a Macan Turbo S. It’s an absolute gem.

Of course, it’s not perfect. As you’ll read in the sections below, the Macan’s performance and luxury come at a big cost. My gut tells me this car deserves at least a 9/10 rating, but in the context of all SUVs – even luxury ones – the Turbo’s incredible performance can’t completely make up for its high cost and low fuel economy.

Surprise, surprise: a not-cheap Porsche. Macan models start as low as $47,800, or $55,400 for the S, which are actually pretty competitive within the luxury crossover segment. But for the privilege of owning the Turbo, you need at least $77,200, and this Performance Pack car starts at $87,700.

That’s before you dig into the options sheet, of course. This nicely equipped Turbo adds carbon ceramic brakes ($8,150), Porsche’s Torque Vectoring Plus system ($1,490), Carmine Red paint ($3,120), and more. The final, as-tested price? $114,840, including $1,050 for destination and handling. Eek.

A lot of people say the Macan looks like a seven-eighths version of the Cayenne, but I have to ask, is that such a bad thing? I love the slope of the roofline, the chiseled front end, and the super clean rear (it looks even better with the badge delete option). This car has the $7,920 Turbo Exterior Package, which gets you these 21-inch wheels, LED headlights, black air intakes, a body-colored roof spoiler, black side blades, black sport exhaust tips, and more. An expensive kit, to be sure, and to be honest, the Macan Turbo looks just as great without it. Line this CUV up against a Mercedes GLC or Audi Q5, and to my eye, it’s the prettiest of the bunch.

I’ll admit, the sheer number of buttons on the Macan’s center stack is overwhelming at first blush, but live with the car for a week, and you get used to it. In fact, I enjoy the fact that there are physical buttons for everything – no car systems hidden in infotainment menus, everything clearly labeled. That aside, the Macan’s cabin uses a simple, easy-to-navigate layout, with a small gauge cluster, infotainment screen front and center, and only a few steering wheel-mounted controls.

It’s a nice place to spend time, too. Front seats are electronically adjustable in all directions, and side bolsters on the seat backs and bottoms can be positioned to your exact liking, as well. The seats themselves are super comfortable and supportive – you won’t suffer fatigue after hours of driving.

Unfortunately, the rear bench only offers okay amounts of head- and legroom, and cargo space tops out at just 53 cubic feet with the seats folded, which is on the smaller side of average. There are certainly roomier alternatives to be had in the premium CUV space.

The Macan’s infotainment system earns high marks for its high-resolution graphics and easy-to-use interface. Everything is clearly labeled and simple to navigate, with instantaneous response, and even features a proximity sensor that enlarges buttons as it notices your finger approaching. Plus, the optional Porsche Connect Plus system ($1,300) turns the car into a wifi hotspot. Porsche offers Apple CarPlay compatibility as standard, though Android Auto isn’t available.

The only demerit here is the relatively small screen size. Yes, there’s a secondary display on the right side of the gauge cluster, but in a time when 12-inch screens are quickly becoming the new norm for luxury cars, the Macan’s 7-inch center display looks decidedly small by comparison.

As you’d expect from any car with “Porsche” and “Turbo” in its name, this Macan is a superstar on the road. This Performance Pack model adds an extra 40 horsepower and 36 pound-feet of torque to the already potent Macan Turbo, for final output numbers of 440 hp and 442 lb-ft.

But it’s not just about numbers or straight-line speed (0-60 in 4.2 seconds, by the way). The Macan deserves high marks for its incredible balance and composure, even on winding roads. The steering is nicely weighted, with lots of great feedback. There’s little body roll while cornering. The ride quality is superb, even on these huge 21-inch wheels. I’d probably be just as happy driving a less expensive Macan GTS, but there’s no arguing that the Turbo is a standout performer amongst premium crossovers.

Macan Turbo models come standard with blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, and adaptive cruise control, among other niceties. But it lacks any active collision prevention/mitigation technology or semi-autonomous features. Porsche will soon offer its new InnoDrive driver assistance tech on the 2018 Panamera and 2019 Cayenne, and it’ll hopefully make its way down to the Macan in the crossover’s next generation.

EPA ratings for the Macan Turbo come in at 17 miles per gallon city, 23 highway, and 19 combined, which, these days, are pretty low. Plus, if you’re like me, you’ll be digging into the throttle on a regular basis to get the most out of this really great-driving package – expect to see real-world fuel economy numbers in the high teens. And remember, the Macan only sips premium fuel, so there’s a slight cost penalty every time you visit the pump. A small price to pay for something that’s so sweet to drive.

 

Photos: Steven Ewing / Motor1.com

Article source: https://www.motor1.com/reviews/227030/2018-porsche-macan-turbo/

Porsche will create an electric platform for sports and supercars that even Audi can use

Porsche will develop an automotive platform for electric sports and supercars, which performance rivals Lamborghini and Audi could tap into.

Dubbed SPE, Automotive News Europe, notes that a senior executive from the VW Group, which owns Porsche, Volkswagen, Audi, Lamborghini and other car brands, confirmed the plans, saying Porsche has been takes with developing an electric vehicle platform “for two-door sports cars and supercars”.

While Porsche is often seen as a rival to sports cars released by Audi and Lamborghini, which both have similar engines and architectures in their respective R8 and Huracan cars, as part of the VW Group Porsche’s SPE is very likely to feed into the other performance car brands.

Further details on what the SPE will consist of or what cars can be expected – electric 911s or brand new Porsche models – have not surfaced, though cars based on the platform are not expected until past 2025.

That means there’s a long wait until we see what the SPE will deliver in terms of high-performance electric cars

However, Porsche already has its Mission E electric car concept which could be seen as a hit as to what direction the SPE platform could head in, though the Mission E’s current guise is very much a performance sedan rather than a white-knuckles on the steering wheel sports car.

For that we’d need to look at the Porsche 918 hybrid petrol-electric hypercar, though we suspect that given what appears to be a fairly lengthy time frame that the SPE platform will be all-electric rather than offer hybrid alternatives.

Either way, it all looks to be an interesting direction Porsche is taking, and if there’s a car maker that can make electric cars dynamic and sporty then Porsche is the one to do it.

Related: CES 2018 highlights

Can electric supercars ever stand up to their petrol brethren? Let us know your thoughts on our Facebook page or tweet @TrustedReviews.

Article source: http://www.trustedreviews.com/news/porsche-spe-electric-sports-supercar-platform-3370358